home runs – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 06:05:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://timothompson.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-60-120x120.png home runs – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ 32 32 Baseball players shortlisted for pre-season awards | Sports https://timothompson.com/baseball-players-shortlisted-for-pre-season-awards-sports/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/baseball-players-shortlisted-for-pre-season-awards-sports/ Two Cougar baseball players are expected to be top hitters this season, an honor for which they have been recognized with Ohio Valley Conference preseason awards. Head coach Sean Lyons said Brady Bunten, a redshirt sophomore hitter from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Brett Johnson, a junior outfielder from Joliet, Illinois, are two talented players who […]]]>

Two Cougar baseball players are expected to be top hitters this season, an honor for which they have been recognized with Ohio Valley Conference preseason awards.

Head coach Sean Lyons said Brady Bunten, a redshirt sophomore hitter from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Brett Johnson, a junior outfielder from Joliet, Illinois, are two talented players who have been instrumental in the success of Last year.

“We’ve been looking for them, you know, to be led producers and ignite the spark to get the offense started. I think these are guys that will also be relied on to just be leaders on offense,” said Lyons.

Lyons said Bunten and Johnson were chosen for the preseason awards because Bunten hit 13 homers last year, which ranks in the top 10 in SIUE history. Johnson had 10 home runs and 33 RBIs.

“I think coaches and such recognize that these are guys who are going to be the top level players in the conference and that’s why they win all the preseason conferences,” Lyons said.

According to Lyons, Bunten and Johnson are dynamic, quick and explosive players who can punch for power.

“A lot of that goes to developing their strength and weight through our athletic performance staff. Just the hard work they put in day in and day out to perform well in their craft. [They’re] just two really good guys who are great teammates,” Lyons said.

Johnson, a junior specializing in corporate marketing, said it was good to receive individual accolades because it means he had a good season last year, but it doesn’t mean much to him.

“Individual accolades, I mean, they will come, which is good, but the goal is really fair. [the] main goal of the team and that is to win the OVC Championship,” Johnson said.

Johnson said he thinks he has a great team for the upcoming season.

“It’s going to be a tough season. There are some really good teams in the conference, but I think everyone in the team has a similar goal, and that’s to win the OVC Championship, to win the tournament. I think we all believe we can do this,” Johnson said.

Johnson said last year that the team failed in some ways towards the end of the season.

“We fell apart, I guess you could say, the back stretch, and I think we really want to focus on a full year of baseball. Complete the schedule, every game we have 100% gold from start to the end,” Johnson said.

Bunten, a junior integrative studies student in a red shirt, said he felt good about winning the award, but there was still work to be done.

“In my opinion these are just words on a paper at this point so we just have to go out there and compete in the season and reunite with the team and get some wins under our belt,” Bunten said. .

Bunten said his goal for this season is to make it to the OVC tournament.

“Win it with my team, and that’s really what it comes down to, help my team any way you can,” Bunten said.

Bunten said he was looking to reduce his strikeout rate.

“Seeing the ball, looking for more off-speed and just pitch recognition. Recognition in general, that’s a big thing I’ve been working on,” Bunten said.

Bunten has stated as an individual that he hopes to get an OVC championship ring.

“I’d like to hit over 15 homers and average over 300 and try to cut my strikeouts in half,” Bunten said.

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Worcester County baseball players are making an impact at Division 1 colleges https://timothompson.com/worcester-county-baseball-players-are-making-an-impact-at-division-1-colleges/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 10:07:30 +0000 https://timothompson.com/worcester-county-baseball-players-are-making-an-impact-at-division-1-colleges/ The 2022 NCAA Division 1 baseball season kicked off last weekend. Here’s a sampling of the many Central Massachusetts stars playing at the D1 level to watch this spring: Support local journalism: Subscribe to telegram.com today for just $1 for 6 months Coleman Picard, Bryant University (Auburn/Auburn High) Second year, pitcher Picard, who played eight […]]]>

The 2022 NCAA Division 1 baseball season kicked off last weekend. Here’s a sampling of the many Central Massachusetts stars playing at the D1 level to watch this spring:

Support local journalism: Subscribe to telegram.com today for just $1 for 6 months

Coleman Picard, Bryant University (Auburn/Auburn High)

Second year, pitcher

Picard, who played eight games last season for the University of Hartford, is one of six transfers from Bryant’s pitching squad this year.

In the Bulldogs’ 10-inning win over No. 12 East Carolina last Saturday, Picard, a 6-foot-2, 185-pound right-hander, picked up the win after pitching 2-1/3 innings of aimless relief. Bryant won all three games at East Carolina and became the first Northeastern Conference baseball team to sweep a three-game series against a nationally ranked opponent.

Picard, a T&G Super Team selection, helped Auburn win the Division 3 championship as a rookie and finished his high school career 10-2, with a 1.42 ERA and 107 strikeouts. He pitched 12 innings out of the bullpen for Hartford and went 1-3 his first season.

Tyler Mudd, Holy Cross (Shrewsbury/St. John’s High/Deerfield Academy)

Freshman, Pitcher/Outfielder

The 5-foot-8, 165-pound southpaw Mudd made his first college start in Game 1 of the Crusaders’ doubleheader in Troy last Saturday. It was a tough outing for Mudd, who allowed 11 earned runs in 4⅓ innings, and a tough weekend for HC, who gave up all four games at Troy, but Mudd plans to play a key role on the pitching team. of Holy Cross this spring, while also seeing time in the outfield.

In each of HC’s other games this past weekend, Mudd started in center field, hit the first hit and had three hits.

After playing for two years at St. John’s, where he was a reserve on the Pioneers’ Division 1A state title team in 2017 and a starting pitcher and one of the Pioneers’ top sophomore hitters, Mudd has transferred to Deerfield Academy.

At Deerfield, Mudd earned New England Baseball Journal New England Second-Team honors in 2020 and 2021.

John West, Boston College (Shrewsbury/Shrewsbury High

Second year, pitcher

The 6-foot-8, 250-pound West, a right-hander, made his first career start for the Eagles against Austin Peay last weekend. West allowed 6 earned runs on 5 hits, walked 3 and struck out 3 in 3⅓ innings and did not consider the call. Austin Peay outlasted the Eagles, 18-17.

As a BC rookie, West made 10 appearances out of the bullpen and went 1-0 with 11 strikeouts in 9⅔ innings of work.

West, who was a T&G Super Team winner in baseball and basketball, led Shrewsbury to his first Division 1 Finals appearance in 19 years as a junior, when he went 3-2 with an 0 ERA, 87 and 45 strikeouts and 15 walks in 32⅓ innings.

He played for the Shrewsbury Post 397 team that made it to the American Legion World Series.

Kevin Skagerlind, UMass (Holden/Wachusett Regional)

Second year, outfielder

Skagerlind, the former Wachusett tri-sport star (baseball, soccer, hockey), had an immediate impact last season for the Minutemen. He saw action in 42 games with 39 starts in center and right field, made no mistakes and led the team with 15 stolen bases. The 6-foot, 195-pound Skagerlind hit .239.

UMass opens the 2022 season on March 4 in Georgetown.

Skagerlind, considered one of the best all-around athletes in Wachusett history, scored more than 100 points in football and hockey, leading those teams to three combined Central Mass titles. as well as a state hockey championship. He helped the Mountaineers qualify for the 2018 Super 8 baseball tournament.

Skagerlind was the home team’s 2020 Male Athlete of the Year.

Jonathan Santucci, Duke (Leominster/Philips Andover)

Freshman, Pitcher/Outfielder

Prior to the season, Duke coach Chris Pollard called Santucci “one of the most talented two-way players in college baseball”.

The 6-foot-2, 200-pound Santucci, who bats and throws on the left, hit .322 in his career at Philips Andover, made a few pitching appearances, was a 2021 Perfect Game All-American first team and ranked as one of the Top 60 rookies in the nation and second overall from Massachusetts.

In his collegiate debut last weekend, Santucci faced three batters in the seventh inning of the Blue Devils’ 8-7 victory over VMI.

Santucci, who participated in the inaugural MLB Draft Combine last summer, is part of Duke’s newcomer class (freshmen and transfers) that D1Baseball.com ranked 10th nationally.

Matt Shaw, Maryland (Brimfield Academy/Worcester)

Second year, infielder

After earning Freshman All-American honors from Perfect Game and Collegiate Baseball in 2021, Shaw started his sophomore season with a sizzling performance in the Terrapins’ three-game sweep against Baylor.

Shaw, Maryland’s starting shortstop and No. 3 batter, hit .538 with 2 home runs and 5 RBIs.

Last season, the 5-foot-11, 185-pound Shaw, who earned Big Ten All-Freshman accolades, started 45 games and led the team and ranked seventh in the Big Ten. with a batting average of .332. He also led the Terrapins with 61 hits and 16 doubles.

Shaw played at Worcester Academy and helped the Hilltoppers reach the semi-finals of the Central New England Prep School baseball tournament in his junior season.

Barry Walsh, Boston College (Sterling/Wachusett Regional)

Junior, outfielder/thrower

Walsh showed his versatility for the Eagles as an outfielder, DH and relief pitcher.

In last weekend’s 2022 home opener at Austin Peay, Walsh started all three games at center, had four hits and drove in a run.

The 6-foot, 195-pound, two-time T&G Super Team winner played 15 games last season with four outfield starts. He batted .200 and had a .385 slugging percentage.

As a freshman in BC, Walsh, a right-hander, made four appearances out of the bullpen.

In his senior season at Wachusett, Walsh went 3-1 with a 2.21 ERA and 31 strikeouts, while batting .364 and on defense.

Cross Jenkins, New Jersey Institute of Technology (Barre/Quabbin Regional)

Second year, pitcher

Jenkins pitched 3⅓ scoreless innings and took the victory in relief as NJIT beat Bellarmine, 9-3, last Saturday.

Last season, Jenkins, a 6-foot-4, 205-pound right-hander, tied for the second-most appearances of any NJIT pitcher with 14, all out of the bullpen. Prior to the NCAA Tournament, he did not allow a run in seven straight appearances.

He hit a season-high five batters in a scoreless 3⅔ innings against UMBC. Jenkins finished 2-0 with one save and a 5.33 ERA.

His junior season at Quabbin, Jenkins threw two hits and went 7-1 with a .41 ERA, 76 strikeouts and 14 walks in 56⅓ innings.

Tyler Nielsen, Maine (Grafton/St. John’s High)

Second year, pitcher

As a freshman, Nielsen went 2-2 with a 4.40 ERA. In his best performance of the season, Nielsen pitched six scoreless innings and struck out five to earn a victory over Albany and help the Black Bears earn a berth in the America East tournament.

Nielsen, a 6-foot-3, 195-pound southpaw, has made eight appearances and four starts in 2021, struck out 24 and walked 11 in 28⅔ innings.

Nielsen was a Central Mass star. Conference in St. John’s in 2019.

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East Texas Pro Baseball Players Talk Lockdown & More While Working APEC | Sports https://timothompson.com/east-texas-pro-baseball-players-talk-lockdown-more-while-working-apec-sports/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 10:45:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/east-texas-pro-baseball-players-talk-lockdown-more-while-working-apec-sports/ Two of the hot topics surrounding professional baseball right now are the MLB lockdown and the recent announcement of the Class of 2022 for the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Nine professional baseball players — most with East Texas ties — were at APEC Monday in Tyler and briefly addressed those issues during their offseason […]]]>

Two of the hot topics surrounding professional baseball right now are the MLB lockdown and the recent announcement of the Class of 2022 for the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Nine professional baseball players — most with East Texas ties — were at APEC Monday in Tyler and briefly addressed those issues during their offseason practices.

At APEC on Monday were AJ Minter of Brook Hill (Atlanta Braves), Josh Tomlin of Whitehouse (free agent), Grayson Rodriguez of Central Heights (Baltimore Orioles), Duke Ellis of Central Heights (Chicago White Sox), Derek Craft of Hawkins (New York Yankees), Chuckie Robinson (Cincinnati Reds), Dakota Phillips of Nacogdoches (Evansville Otters, independent), Zak Jordan of Gilmer (Garden City, independent) and Michael Slaten of Nacogdoches (Sioux City, independent). Tyler’s Parker Bates (Kansas City Royals) and Hudson’s Riley Smith (Arizona Diamondbacks) are both training at APEC in the offseason but couldn’t be there Monday.

Regarding his thoughts on the lockout, Tomlin, a 12-year MLB veteran, had a quick response.

“I have several thoughts on the lockdown,” Tomlin said, “but right now it’s just one of those haste and wait like a rain delay. It stinks a bit from the fans point of view. It’s not an ideal situation for the fans and for the players either. It’s a negotiation tactic owners have been using for years. I hope they find a solution so that we can get out of this as soon as possible and get baseball going again.

While currently a free agent, Tomlin was a member of World Series champion Atlanta Braves last season. Also on the Braves was Minter, who made three World Series pitching appearances.

“As I keep telling everyone, the No. 1 goal is to get on the field, start the season on time, and get to spring training on time,” he said. said Minter. “At the same time, you have to stay ready.”

For minor leaguers like Craft, the lockout has no direct effect at this time.

“That’s one of the benefits of being a minor leaguer,” Craft said, “that there’s not a lot, is not having to worry about everything that’s going on with the MLB Players Union and the owners I have the advantage of being able to block that out and just work to get better every day.

Regarding the Hall of Fame, Craft and Minter made brief comments.

“To be honest, I missed it,” Craft said. “I worked with the high school basketball team in Hawkins (where his dad, Mike, is the head coach), and I didn’t even know the ad came out until some of the players from high school are starting to ask me what I was thinking.. Kudos to the guys who made it. I know there’s been a bit of controversy about the guys who didn’t make it, but I know they’ve all had great careers, regardless of the storylines surrounding some of them. But congratulations to these guys. I looked up to a lot of these players.

“David Ortiz, he means so much to baseball, on and off the field,” Minter said. “I guess there’s not much I can say. I feel like the voting system needs to change a bit, but at the same time, to be in the Hall of Fame, you have to earn it, you can’t give it away. I wish some of the guys had come in, but at the same time you have to accept the results of the Hall of Fame vote. I grew up watching these guys. They were your heroes. It’s heartbreaking because some of these guys don’t make it into the Hall of Fame, and you feel like they were Hall of Famers to you growing up. But like I said, it’s earned, and you have to earn it. It really is a special group of players.

Craft is coming off his fourth year in the minor leagues, finishing with a 3.68 ERA and 57 strikeouts in stops at Single-A Tampa and High-A Hudson Valley.

“I don’t know where I’m going to end up this year,” Craft said. “It’s one of those things where I really can’t control it. I just have to focus on what I can control, which is myself and getting better every day. Wherever they end up placing me this year, I’m just going to do my best and see how far I can go.

Another player who just completed his fourth year of professional baseball is Rodriguez, who is ranked as the top pitcher in MLB and 8th overall.

“It’s definitely a big accomplishment, but I’m trying not to focus on those awards or accolades or whatever you call them, but ultimately just on my way to the big leagues,” Rodriguez said. “Obviously the goal is to start the season in the big leagues, but if not, I’ll probably be in Triple-A.”

Rodriguez was 9-1 with a 2.36 ERA and 161 strikeouts in saves at High-A Aberdeen and Double-A Bowie.

Ellis — Rodriguez’s former high school teammate and the son of Bullard head baseball coach Robert Ellis — just completed his first professional baseball season at High-A. He finished with a .200 ERA, four home runs, 18 RBIs and 23 stolen bases.

“For me, this year has been kind of a grind,” Ellis said. “I was injured for eight weeks at the end of the season. It was a big learning curve for me. I really had to take care of my body throughout the year. If I could do that , I would have a full year and that would be fine.

———

Las Vegas Raiders safety and Tyler Best Preps 2019 speaker Kavon Frazier were also there Monday as his company recently purchased a partnership with APEC.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Frazier said. “It’s special to be part of the APEC family.”

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Joey Hammond – Head Coach – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/joey-hammond-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 14:41:40 +0000 https://timothompson.com/joey-hammond-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ High Point University athletic director Dan Hauser announced the hiring of Joey Hammond as the head coach of the High Point baseball program on June 17, 2021. Hammond becomes the fourth head coach of the Division I era of the HPU and the eighth captain in program history. Hammond has spent the past seven seasons […]]]>


High Point University athletic director Dan Hauser announced the hiring of Joey Hammond as the head coach of the High Point baseball program on June 17, 2021.

Hammond becomes the fourth head coach of the Division I era of the HPU and the eighth captain in program history.

Hammond has spent the past seven seasons in the Triad as a volunteer assistant coach at Wake Forest where he has worked with hitters and outfielders. He guided 17 Demon Deacon hitters to All-ACC honors during his tenure and saw eight players recognized as All-Americans during his seven years.

Hammond made Wake Forest’s offense one of the best in the country, culminating with a 43-20 season in 2017 where the Demon Deacons were one game away from qualifying for the College World Series. That season, Wake Forest placed in the nation’s top 20 in batting average, base percentage, doubles, runs, runs per game, walks, strokes, strokes.
percentage, and home runs after becoming the first Division I school in the country to hit 100 home runs in the BBCOR bat era with a record 106 home runs.

Prior to joining Wake Forest, Hammond was head coach at Westchester Country Day School here at High Point for five seasons. He led the Wildcats to the NCISAA 2A Final Four every five years and won three state championships. He compiled a 104-31-1 record at Westchester Country Day and played 14 college baseball graduates.

Hammond played 11 years professionally before becoming a coach and was drafted in the 25th round of the 1998 MLB Draft by the Baltimore Orioles, spending eight seasons with the O organization and three in the Philadelphia Phillies farming system. His last eight seasons of his playing career have been spent at the AA and AAA levels, and he has played at least 100 games at every infield position and over 150 games in the outfield. Hammond ended his career with a .274 batting average with over 1,100 hits and was named to the 2000s All-Star team of the Reading Phillies (AA).

A regular in Tar Heel State, Hammond received a BA in Communications from Charlotte, where he was a 49ers shortstop from 1996 to 1998. He was twice a member of the All-Conference USA All-Tournament team. and was named First Team All-Conference USA in 1998 after defeating 0.398 with 100 hits.

A native of Frederick, Maryland, he was inducted into the Frederick County YMCA Hall of Fame in 2019. Hammond currently resides in Greensboro with his wife Rebecca and their three sons, Caleb, Josh and Mason.


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Five Wetumpka baseball players sign to play college baseball | Sports https://timothompson.com/five-wetumpka-baseball-players-sign-to-play-college-baseball-sports/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 21:59:28 +0000 https://timothompson.com/five-wetumpka-baseball-players-sign-to-play-college-baseball-sports/ Wetumpka High School’s baseball program sent five players to the collegiate ranks Wednesday afternoon. Kyle Morrison (Troy), Garrit Terrell (Snead State), Noah Jones (Southern Union State CC), Dawson Fuller (Southern Union State CC) and Douglas Johnson (Southern Union State CC) have each signed national letters of intent to play to the next level on Wednesday. […]]]>

Wetumpka High School’s baseball program sent five players to the collegiate ranks Wednesday afternoon.

Kyle Morrison (Troy), Garrit Terrell (Snead State), Noah Jones (Southern Union State CC), Dawson Fuller (Southern Union State CC) and Douglas Johnson (Southern Union State CC) have each signed national letters of intent to play to the next level on Wednesday.

“Having five guys enrolled in a class is very special for the program, very special for the school, the community, and it’s certainly a reflection of what they’ve been doing since they’ve been in our program,” said said Wetumpka coach Michael Dismukes. “For me, it makes me very proud of how they’ve grown from boys to men in five years and the hard work they’ve put in is incredible. Words cannot describe what each of them means to me.

Playing the hot corner, Morrison proved to be one of Alabama State’s best hitters last year. The senior third baseman hit .442 with four home runs and 36 RBIs while batting both in the middle of the lineup and as the leadoff hitter at times.

He showed his power at the plate with 25 extra hits throughout the year while striking out just 11 times.






Wetumpka third baseman Kyle Morrison signed a national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball in Troy.


Morrison has been a staple in both Wetumpka’s lineup and at third base since he started as a rookie. He started attracting interest from Troy’s coaching staff just over a year ago and signed up to play for the Trojans in August.

“Troy is just a place where, as soon as I walked onto campus, I felt like this was the place to be,” Morrison said of his decision. “I love the coaching staff. Their field is unlike any other and I really see myself succeeding there.

Terrell also had a pretty impressive junior season for the Indians last year. Wetumpka’s starting catcher finished the year with a .352 batting average, 37 hits, 9 doubles and 18 RBIs.

He was named to the Elmore County team for his efforts and then committed to playing college baseball at Snead State Community College in July. Terrell expects to compete for a starting position as soon as he enters campus, and he hopes to develop his skills to play at the Division I level and possibly get drafted to play pro ball in the future.

Snead State has a reputation for pushing players to the Division I level, and that was one of Terrell’s selling points when he made his decision.







Signature of Garrit Terrell

Wetumpka catcher Garrit Terrell signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball at Snead State Community College.


“The first thing Garrit is going to bring is toughness,” Dismukes said. “He can handle any pitching staff. The durability behind the plate and the energy he plays with every day will take him to the next level. He manages the game very well and he is the same child every day. He brings energy every day, and that’s what makes him special.

Jones quickly made up his mind to commit to Southern Union State after being offered. One day to be exact. Jones, an infielder for the Indians, was offered by SUSCC head coach Aaron Everett on Aug. 17.

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On August 18, he enlisted.

Jones is a huge threat on the base lines and one of the best defenders of any infielder in the region. He finished his junior season with a .300 batting average and 4 doubles, 2 homers, 17 RBIs and 9 stolen bases.







Signature of Noah Jones

On Wednesday, Wetumpka middle infielder Noah Jones signed his national letter of intent to play college baseball at Southern Union State Community College.


“Southern Union has great baseball facilities and a great coach,” Jones said. “They are great people and they have a great tradition for baseball. So why not Southern Union. I love Coach Everett there. It’s amazing and everything I wanted is there. Great facility. Big stadium. The fans come to support us. This is where I want to be.

Fuller was the first of the Wetumpka group to commit to playing at the college level. Fuller, a left-handed pitcher, was offered by Southern Union State CC in March and signed to play for Coach Everett and the Bison in June.







Signature of Dawson Fuller

Wetumpka pitcher Dawson Fuller signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball at Southern Union State Community College.


SUSCC first got interested in Fuller during his junior campaign, and his numbers show why. The left-hander finished his junior season with a 7-4 overall record with a 3.50 ERA and 83 strikeouts in 52 innings pitched.

His fastball is in the mid-to-high 80s, but his best pitch is a wipeout change.

“I really felt like they were really heavy on me and they really wanted me there,” Fuller said. “I always wanted to go somewhere I was wanted, so it was a pretty easy decision. I already knew the program and what a full program it was, but Coach Everett really runs the program from professional way.

Johnson will also get the chance to pitch for SUSCC and the Bison, but he’s currently committed to playing both ways in college.

Johnson jumped on Coach Everett’s radar this summer with his travel ball team, and he quickly signed on after being offered in August. He pitches for the Wetumpka team, but will get a chance to pitch and play in the outfield in college.

Last year as a junior, Johnson was 7-2 on the mound with a 2.00 ERA and 72 strikeouts. While playing center field, he averaged .300 with 26 hits, 14 RBIs, and scored 21 runs.







Signature of Douglas Johnson

Wetumpka pitcher and outfielder Douglas Johnson signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball at Southern Union State Community College.


“I went there for a tour and really fell in love with this campus,” Johnson said. “Of course, the coach and the team are great. I followed them for a long time, and they have an incredible baseball program. I just fell in love with them. I’m super excited to be a two-way player there. Hopefully I can play both roles big and throw well while still hitting.

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A Millennium Guide for the baseball players you grew up with in retirement https://timothompson.com/a-millennium-guide-for-the-baseball-players-you-grew-up-with-in-retirement/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/a-millennium-guide-for-the-baseball-players-you-grew-up-with-in-retirement/ No, this is not a thirty-something in existential crisis, players of our age are suddenly retiring. Buster Posey has been a long time favorite of mine. We’re just under three months apart, so I had the privilege of watching it throughout my 20s and into my 30s. With a career dating back to 2008 and […]]]>


No, this is not a thirty-something in existential crisis, players of our age are suddenly retiring.

Buster Posey has been a long time favorite of mine. We’re just under three months apart, so I had the privilege of watching it throughout my 20s and into my 30s.

With a career dating back to 2008 and a rise in the Giants of San Francisco for a time, Posey’s sudden retirement touched the hearts of many millennials. Love or hate the Giants, Posey seems to be one of those players who had the respect of baseball fans everywhere. To me, he’s the face of Giants baseball.

According to Baseball-Reference, Posey ended his career with a .302 / .372 / .460 hitting line, 158 home runs, 729 RBIs and 44.9 WAR. In my mind, he’s a guaranteed member of the Hall of Fame – even if it takes a few ballots.

Posey has refused to play during the shortened 2020 season so he can spend time with his family during the rise of COVID-19. His 2021 season has shown that his free time has not affected his athletic ability, as he has had an exceptional year – his best since 2014. Posey reached 0.304 / 0.390 / 0.499 (140 OPS +) with 18 home runs and 56 RBIs in 113. games and made his seventh all-star team.

So what happens next? In this case, Joey Bart becomes Posey’s replacement. But what happens to us 30s who love Posey?

I hate to tell you, but all of your faves are due to retire soon. Maybe they take managerial positions or become analysts. As a young child, falling in love with baseball and only having access to cubs for a while I remember the departure of Ryne Sandberg and his career as a coach and manager. I think about how Ethan Katz is almost my age and the coaches. A-Rod unfortunately has a lot of airtime – another player I grew up with.

Soon Albert Pujols will retire. Just like José Abreu. We’re all going to be in our feelings, writing lengthy tweets about the impact they had on us and how lucky we were to have them on our favorite teams. Maybe we’ll tear ourselves apart when a photo is tweeted of your favorite player holding the World events trophy with a championship hat twisted on top of their head. If you are lucky enough, they will have a role to play on your team in the future. You will one day travel to Cooperstown and listen to their Hall of Fame speech in person and think about all the joy they brought you in their glory days.

It’s going to be fine, folks. You will find a young player in the minors or a rookie to be your new guy. He will retire someday and the cycle will repeat. But that’s what I love about baseball: watching players grow within your organization or even on another team, enjoying their careers, shopping for their jerseys, and tweeting how special they were on Twitter.

Enjoy your team and its dynamic players while they are still playing – prepare for their surprise retirement too.

Support them as often as you can. I watched Andrew McCutchen make his Indianapolis debut, and have since traveled to several stadiums to watch him since his debut in 2009. I’ve only missed two years, one with an injury and one with an injury. of the pandemic. One of those games was a Giants vs Nationals game in DC, so I got to see Posey as well.

Remember, too, that athletes are normal people too. Posey has very young twin daughters who he wants to hang out with. Traveling can certainly be fun, but watching your kids grow up is too.

I’m leaving to play a few highlights of Posey’s career and maybe come back to see Abreu dominate. Maybe love / hate-watch the great career Pujols has had so far.

I suggest you do that too.


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who will be the next one ? – The VOICE of the College https://timothompson.com/who-will-be-the-next-one-the-voice-of-the-college/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 21:11:07 +0000 https://timothompson.com/who-will-be-the-next-one-the-voice-of-the-college/ PHOTOS – Wikimedia Commons and nsusharks.com There are good examples of professional sports players who started out in community colleges, but a lot of people are unaware that MCCC had a few. Two MCCC alumni who entered Major League Baseball are Heath Fillmyer who played for the Kansas City Royals and Dave Gallagher who played […]]]>


PHOTOS – Wikimedia Commons and nsusharks.com

There are good examples of professional sports players who started out in community colleges, but a lot of people are unaware that MCCC had a few. Two MCCC alumni who entered Major League Baseball are Heath Fillmyer who played for the Kansas City Royals and Dave Gallagher who played for the Oakland A’s and other teams.

There are also more recent graduates who are on a Major League trajectory. Denny Brady and Greg Delgado were both part of the Mercer Vikings baseball team and play baseball at different levels.

Dennis “Denny” Brady graduated from Mercer in 2017. He was drafted in 2017 by the Los Angeles Angel’s in the 7th round and is currently a Double A affiliate for the Rocket City Trash Pandas. The Double A league is the second highest league in baseball.

PHOTO courtesy of Denny Brady

In a recent interview, Brady was asked how playing on a minor league sports team is compared to Mercer’s baseball team. He said, “Pretty similar actually. Obviously, Mercer doesn’t have a lot of money, so the players have to do a lot on their own. It’s very similar to minor leagues, except the funds are there. They’re very minimalist in what they give us, so there’s a lot of money coming out of minor league pockets to help sustain our lives, I guess you could say… ”

Thinking back to his time as a Viking, Brady said, “At Mercer I really learned to, I guess, stand up for myself and take charge of my career since there were no D1 schools… Everything depended on people. , like teammates and coaches. They didn’t have much to give you, but you know you could feed on them, they could feed on you.

Current baseball head coach Fred Carella, who was an assistant coach in 2017, remembers Brady well.

“Denny’s performance in 2017 was phenomenal. He was a member of the 1st All-American team and the Division 2 junior college pitcher of the year. Every time he took the mound we felt like we were going to win the game, ”said Carella.

Denny has fond memories of particular games from his time as a Viking.

“Yes, so I took part in two matches in the [NJCAA] World events. It’s the second game that is the most memorable for me. Yeah, it was just the team we were playing with, like we were going blow for blow with them… I knew that was the last time I played with this team because I mean [if] we won this match, we were going to play one more match, [but] if we lost, we were done… ”he declared.

Coach Carella also remembers the series saying, “Denny had an outstanding performance in the World Series. I think the game he pitched in the district tournament, against CCBC Catonsville, was even better. He threw a full shutout in that game and was in total control from start to finish. “

When asked if he thought Brady was the kind of person to make it to the minor leagues, Carella replied, “Yeah, I thought Denny would be drafted and play professional baseball. I still believe he has a chance of qualifying for the Major Leagues ”.

He added, “It was great knowing that I played a small role in helping Denny achieve his dream of playing professional baseball. As coaches, our goal is to help all of our players take baseball to the next level. It could be a four-year school or a professional opportunity.

Greg Delgado is another student who is not on a minor league team but who has been recognized for his excellent baseball ability, willingness to play and good attitude.

Delgado was a former MCCC Viking for the baseball team who graduated last spring and currently attends Nova Southeastern in Florida and continues to play baseball.

At the end of his season last spring, Delgado received 3 NJCAA titles. He was the “First Team All-American”, “Garden State Athletic Conference Player of the Year” and “Region 19 Player of the Year”.

Coach Carella says Delgado was, like Brady, a first-team All-American player.

“He hit in the middle of our line-up and was a team captain. He’s attending Nova Southeastern on a sports scholarship and I expect him to have a big impact on their baseball team in the spring.

Delgado says of his goals, “I hope to win a national championship this year.”

When asked to recall all of the games that had the most impact, Delgado said: End-of-season game at Morris County College. This game was supposed to take first place in our region and that is exactly what we did. I had a day with 2 home runs with 5 RBIs and as a team we played really well.

Asked about his pre-game strategies, Delgado said: “During my time at Mercer before games, I was sticking to a mindset where I visualized success in a lot of different situations before the game and then at the time of the game, I was sticking to my approach and playing with passion.


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Josh Jordan – Assistant Coach / Recruitment Coordinator – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/josh-jordan-assistant-coach-recruitment-coordinator-baseball-coaches/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/josh-jordan-assistant-coach-recruitment-coordinator-baseball-coaches/ Chez Duc: After six seasons with head coach Chris Pollard at Appalachian State, Josh Jordan joined Pollard and the Duke baseball program in June 2012. The program’s recruiting coordinator, Jordan was promoted to associate head coach in July 2015. In addition to his role in recruiting, Jordan also works with Duke’s receivers and outfielder and […]]]>


Chez Duc: After six seasons with head coach Chris Pollard at Appalachian State, Josh Jordan joined Pollard and the Duke baseball program in June 2012. The program’s recruiting coordinator, Jordan was promoted to associate head coach in July 2015. In addition to his role in recruiting, Jordan also works with Duke’s receivers and outfielder and teaches both hitting and basic running.

Jordan helped lead the program to another historic season in 2021, winning the first ACC baseball tournament title in the program’s history, and his first conference title since 1961. Duke streaked 12 straight wins in May to win the ACC title and secure a place in an NCAA Regional. Jordan saw two outfielders, Joey Loperfido and RJ Schreck, make All-ACC selections, and Peter Matt become the first Blue Devil in program history to hit 15 home runs and steal 15 goals. Offensively, Duke totaled 78 home runs, the fourth in lineup tradition and the most since 1998, highlighted by Schreck’s 18s and Matt’s 15s, the second pair to each hit more than 15 home runs in one. single season.

Jordan helped Duke to a magical playoff streak in 2019, culminating with the program’s second straight appearance and the second appearance in the NCAA Super Regional. The NCAA tournament selection marked the Blue Devils’ second straight appearance and third in the past four seasons.

Duke reaped the rewards of Jordan’s efforts in 2018, hosting one of the most successful seasons in program history. Ranked in the preseason for the first time in program history, the 2018 Blue Devils lived up to the early season hype, recording the first 40-game season in program history while also winning. a program record of 18 ACC wins and qualifying for the first NCAA Super Regional in school history.

Baseball America ranked Duke in its top 25 for 13 weeks during the 2018 regular season, more than doubling the total number of weeks the Blue Devils were ranked in the publication’s first 36 years (6 ). With an overall record of 45-18, Duke not only set a program record for wins in a season, but also reached 30 wins for the fifth consecutive year, the program’s longest streak since the Blue Devils have compiled a seven-game winning streak of 30 wins. 1992-98 campaigns.

For his instrumental contributions, Jordan won the 2018 ABCA / Baseball America Assistant Coach of the Year honors.

Just two years earlier, Jordan had helped Duke make a general bid at the 2016 NCAA tournament, ending the program’s 55-year drought without making the playoff event. After starting the season 10-13 (1-7 ACC), the Blue Devils are 23-9 in their last 32 regular season games, including a 13-8 ACC record. During that span, Duke went 9-7 against RPI Top 20 teams, claimed series victories over Georgia Tech, Clemson, Virginia Tech, Florida State and Pitt, and posted a perfect 10-0 score. in non-conference match.

During Jordan’s time with the program, 33 Blue Devils were selected in the Major League Baseball Draft, including a school record tied at seven in 2018. Of those 33 players, 12 were selected in the first 10 rounds. of the draft, which is more than a third of the total of Duke’s top 10 picks in program history.

In Appalachian State (6 seasons • 2007-12): Prior to coming to Durham, Jordan spent six seasons as an assistant coach under current Duke head coach Chris Pollard at Appalachian State. The Mountaineers have won 30 or more games in each of Jordan’s six seasons with the program.

Jordan played a key role in Appalachian State’s strong 2012 campaign, a season in which the Mountaineers set a school record for wins with an overall record of 41-18. The Mountaineers won the Southern Conference Championship and secured a berth in the NCAA Championship, qualifying for the Charlotte Regional Championship round with victories over National Powers Virginia and Oklahoma.

At Boone, Jordan oversaw the development of 17 players ultimately selected in the MLB Draft. Prior to the arrival of Jordan and Pollard, Appalachian State had not produced a Major League Baseball rookie since the 1996 campaign.

Small years: Prior to joining the ASU staff, Jordan spent the 2006 season with Young Harris College, helping the Mountain Lions to finish second in the 2006 National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) tournament in Region XVII. Jordan also coached Charlie Blackmon, currently a member of the Colorado Rockies, during his time at Young Harris.

Prior to his stint at Young Harris, Jordan spent two seasons at Fort Hays State in Hays, Kan. He began his time at Fort Hays as a graduate assistant in 2004 before becoming the Tigers’ top recruiting assistant and coordinator the following year.

Academic career: Jordan played second base at Catawba College from 1999 to 2002, leading the Indians to the South Atlantic Conference Tournament Championship in 2002. He began his coaching career as a volunteer coach at his alma mater in 2003.

Jordan holds a BS in Social Sciences from Catawba and an MS in Exercise Science from Fort Hays State in 2005. Originally from Gastonia, North Carolina, he was awarded a Letter four-year-old and interpreter of all lectures at Hunter Huss High School. from 1995-98.

Staff: Jordan and his wife (Erika) reside in Durham, North Carolina with their son (Jaxon) and daughter (Lillian).

Last updated on 10/14/2021


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What baseball players can teach politicians https://timothompson.com/what-baseball-players-can-teach-politicians/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 05:02:42 +0000 https://timothompson.com/what-baseball-players-can-teach-politicians/ Watching quite a few baseball games this summer, I couldn’t help but be struck by the scoreless heroes’ explanations for their batting exploits. They all say pretty much the same thing: “I haven’t tried to do too much. I stayed in me. I just took what they gave me and looked for an opening. That’s […]]]>


Watching quite a few baseball games this summer, I couldn’t help but be struck by the scoreless heroes’ explanations for their batting exploits. They all say pretty much the same thing: “I haven’t tried to do too much. I stayed in me. I just took what they gave me and looked for an opening.

That’s good advice, but if you see a lot of games you know it’s mostly in the spotlight in the breach. Trying to do too much is exactly what most hitters do these days. They swing for the fences and end up with a few more homers, but a ton of strikeouts and a low batting average. Going hard for home runs works for some exceptional hitters, but for the average player it’s a mistake.

Taking what’s there for you and not going overboard is the best recipe for success, not only in baseball but in a wide range of activities in modern life. Most of the time, this is the best strategy for people who are elected to public office.


In the 2000s, I spent four years teaching in the Leadership Studies School of a major university. I enjoyed it and learned a lot, but found myself puzzled by the main purpose of the program – they were bright and courageous leaders who attempted the seemingly impossible and triumphed over them. one way or another. These were Winston Churchill, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela and, in this country, Martin Luther King Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. He leaned on the liberal side; Ronald Reagan was not part of the standard program.

The more I taught there, the more I became convinced that the crucial challenges of leadership in government and politics are those that face leaders who are pretty much ordinary people, neither brilliant nor exceptionally talented. If I was asked to advise them (which I have never been) I would say don’t try to do too much – take what you are given and see if you can do something with it.

In my experience, most politicians who become mayors or governors do not pursue this strategy. They seek out the most intractable problems in their constituency and promise to solve them. Given a four-year tenure, they pledge to fix underperforming schools, end gang violence and restore racial harmony. Like hitters determined to swing for fences, they hit an embarrassing part of the time.

American public life would be better off if public leadership education was devoted a little more to showing elected officials how, as athletes say, to play within themselves. But there is not much written on this subject. This kind of advice goes against most of the shibboleths that political candidates have learned to campaign on over the years.

ONE OF A FEW RECENT POLITICAL LEADERS George Latimer, mayor of St. Paul for six terms in the 1970s and 1980s, championed a strategy of knowing your limits. When asked to give advice to new mayors across the country, he gave short, succinct advice: “Don’t look for problems, look for opportunities. In other words, don’t start by trying to achieve dramatic results in educational performance. or close the wealth gap. Start by finding fruit on hand. Plow the snow. Clean up the paperwork from the authorization process. Keep the buses running on time. Then you might be able to tackle some of the cosmic issues.

More recently, another accomplished mayor, Ralph Becker of Salt Lake City, who served from 2007 to 2015, offered a more detailed account of his successes, failures and lessons learned. Write in the Review of state and local governments, he recounted how he fought against gender discrimination, created an effective recycling program and built a new downtown theater, overcoming opposition from much of the local business community.

Many of Becker’s prescriptions are familiar, if not obvious: to foster broad participation in the community; pay particular attention to the ultimate costs of any initiative. But much of Becker’s advice goes directly back to Latimer’s philosophy. “Decide what can realistically be achieved, being ambitious but not wasting energy chasing impossible dreams. … When basic services are well provided… voters and taxpayers can see the results of investing in government, and trust is built.

For Becker as for Latimer, governing within limits is intimately linked to the notion of seeking consensus and reconciliation. Choose battles carefully. Cultivate your critiques rather than denigrate them. In this regard, Becker is following in the footsteps of iconic Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, who said much the same thing a little more bluntly. Daley built a reputation for himself as an autocratic political leader, and sometimes he was, but he was also keenly attuned to the need for civic consensus. “Don’t get into any fights you can’t win,” Daley used to say to his cronies. “Don’t take part in any fights you don’t need to win.”

MAYBE THE RECENT LEADER whose career best exemplifies all of these ideas is Jerry Brown, who was California’s youngest governor (1975-1983) and much later the oldest (2011-2019). When Brown first became governor, he dreamed of remaking state government in a dramatic style and almost immediately began to run for president. He had tangible achievements and won a second term, but by 1982 voters had had enough of him and he was beaten badly in a campaign for the US Senate.

The dark-haired man who returned to the Statehouse in 2011 at the age of 72 was a man fully prepared to implement the philosophy of limits he once promulgated but failed to observe. He was a negotiator like he had never been before. He stayed the course on questionable spending programs his fellow Democrats wanted to implement and successfully lobbied for an increase in income and sales taxes that brought the state to the brink of insolvency. tax to stable economic health. When he retired at the end of his fourth term, he was arguably the most successful governor in modern California history and one of America’s most admired politicians.

It is telling to compare Brown’s latest version with Arnold Schwarzenegger, who took office as governor of California when incumbent President Gray Davis was recalled in 2004. Schwarzenegger had no patience with modest goals. “Each governor is proposing to move boxes to reorganize the government,” Schwarzenegger said in his first State of State address. “I don’t want to move the boxes. I want to blow them up. A year later, he withdrew his reorganization plan, almost none of which was enacted.

THERE IS NO INFALLIBLE FORMULA to succeed in politics or government, and one can always find elected leaders who have disdained restraint and conciliation and succeeded in pushing forward an ambitious agenda. Margaret Thatcher is the holy matron of these leaders. She said she didn’t believe in consensus at all – that she was a “convinced politician”. As long as she had the voices to do what she wanted, she didn’t care what the other side thought. She not only survived 12 years as British Prime Minister, but also implemented a whole host of free market changes that will impact Britons for generations to come. Of course, she could behave this way because she was operating in a parliamentary system, which gave her almost unlimited legislative power; succeeding in this way in our two-party competitive environment is much more difficult, and sometimes impossible.

Nonetheless, some recent American politicians have been determined to play it Thatcher’s way and have had some success doing so. Scott Walker, Republican Governor of Wisconsin from 2011 to 2019 It is fair to call Walker Exhibit A in the use of Thatcherian politics in America during this century. Since his departure, Republican governors in a few other states have taken an equally hard-line approach, with mixed success.

But it’s also fair to say that these are exceptions. Most of the successful political leaders of recent times have, like the late-career version of Jerry Brown, prospered following the guidance of Latimer and Becker, carefully seeking openings rather than leaving, like Schwarzenegger, to cross the lines. barriers.

No one wants to take the romance away from political leadership. It is informative and often inspiring to study the careers of transformational leaders who face the seemingly impossible and manage to achieve it. But if you’re a leader with only ordinary human gifts, operating in ordinary times, it makes more sense to act like you’re at bat in the ninth inning of a tied baseball game: take what they get from you. give, look for openings, and try not to overdo it.


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UMN Crookston announces assistant baseball coaches https://timothompson.com/umn-crookston-announces-assistant-baseball-coaches/ Tue, 31 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/umn-crookston-announces-assistant-baseball-coaches/ The University of Minnesota’s Crookston baseball program has announced the addition of Dalton Parks and Clarke Peterson as assistant baseball coaches. Parks and Peterson are both college alumni, helping coach Steve Gust establish a strong culture of success for Golden Eagle baseball, including four appearances in the NSIC tournament in the past seven seasons. “I’m […]]]>


The University of Minnesota’s Crookston baseball program has announced the addition of Dalton Parks and Clarke Peterson as assistant baseball coaches. Parks and Peterson are both college alumni, helping coach Steve Gust establish a strong culture of success for Golden Eagle baseball, including four appearances in the NSIC tournament in the past seven seasons.

“I’m more than happy with the staff we have at Minnesota Crookston,” said head coach Steve Gust. “These guys have a passion for the game and will do whatever it takes to make our players and this program successful. They are hardworking, knowledgeable and want nothing more than to see this program continue to move forward.

Parks returns to UMN Crookston after spending two seasons as a graduate school assistant at NCAA Division II University of West Alabama in Livingston, Alabama. He will serve as the hitting / outfield coach for UMN Crookston. Parks oversaw the outfielder, assisted hitter, on and off campus recruiting, practice planning, field work and other assigned duties in West Alabama. Parks helped the Tigers to a 22-32 combined record in two seasons. In 2021, West Alabama reached 0.277 as a team with 195 points, 53 doubles, four triples, 18 homers and 166 RBIs. They posted a base percentage of 0.369 and an OPS of 0.751. The Tigers walked 137 times and had a 0.382 slugging percentage.

“This position requires someone with a strong work ethic and knowledge of the offensive philosophy of our program, and Dalton fits that description very well,” said Gust. “He’s been in baseball since he left our program as a player. It shows the passion and the desire that we look for in a coach. His experience, knowledge of the program, and typing philosophy are exactly what we need. “

Prior to West Alabama, Parks was an assistant coach at Clarendon College, a Division I junior college in Texas. During his time he worked with hitters and also helped with practice planning and recruiting. For the 2019 season, Clarendon hit 0.321, with a base percentage of 0.426, a slugging percentage of 0.534 and 47 home runs.

In addition, Parks was the head coach of the Muhlenberg County Stallions, an Ohio Valley League summer varsity baseball team. Additionally, he worked as an assistant coach for the Sunflower Collegiate League Derby Twins during the 2019 summer season.

Parks’ first job out of high school was as an assistant coach for Hunter HS in West Valley City, Utah. His responsibilities included conducting training, setting up the roster, training third base, working on and off the field, and field maintenance.

Parks played for the Golden Eagles during the 2015 and 2016 seasons, helping Coach Gust inject a strong culture into the program. Parks was part of the first UMN Crookston baseball team to compete in the NSIC tournament since 2001. He was a recipient of the NSIC All-Academic Team. Parks has appeared in 33 games and started 14 as a senior as the Golden Eagles have won 25 games in his senior year. As a junior, Parks started 49 of the 50 games played by UMN Crookston.

He received his Bachelor of Science in Sports and Recreation Management from UMN Crookston. He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in physical education at the University of West Alabama.

Peterson returns to Minnesota Crookston after a season as an assistant coach at Northland Community and Technical College. He will coach Minnesota Crookston’s pitching, strength and conditioning. Northland reached 0.296 as a team in the 2021 season, with 105 runs scored, 27 doubles, 17 homers and 95 RBIs. On the mound, they had 110 strikeouts for 81 walks.

“Clarke’s passion for this program is unmatched,” said Gust. “As a player he was a passionate teammate and eager to learn and improve every day. He has a training conducive to the coaching profession. He has worked hard for the past two years to learn the new science of pitching, body biomechanics, strength and conditioning.

As a player, Peterson played for the Golden Eagles for five years as a receiver and pitcher. He was a team leader during his time at UMN Crookston. As a junior in 2019, Peterson appeared in seven games and started two. Peterson made an appearance on the mound in 2020, pitching a white inning, with a hit and one strikeout.

Peterson received his bachelor’s degree from Minnesota Crookston in 2020.

Dalton Parks


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