college baseball – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 06:05:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://timothompson.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-60-120x120.png college baseball – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ 32 32 Worcester County baseball players are making an impact at Division 1 colleges https://timothompson.com/worcester-county-baseball-players-are-making-an-impact-at-division-1-colleges/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 10:07:30 +0000 https://timothompson.com/worcester-county-baseball-players-are-making-an-impact-at-division-1-colleges/ The 2022 NCAA Division 1 baseball season kicked off last weekend. Here’s a sampling of the many Central Massachusetts stars playing at the D1 level to watch this spring: Support local journalism: Subscribe to telegram.com today for just $1 for 6 months Coleman Picard, Bryant University (Auburn/Auburn High) Second year, pitcher Picard, who played eight […]]]>

The 2022 NCAA Division 1 baseball season kicked off last weekend. Here’s a sampling of the many Central Massachusetts stars playing at the D1 level to watch this spring:

Support local journalism: Subscribe to telegram.com today for just $1 for 6 months

Coleman Picard, Bryant University (Auburn/Auburn High)

Second year, pitcher

Picard, who played eight games last season for the University of Hartford, is one of six transfers from Bryant’s pitching squad this year.

In the Bulldogs’ 10-inning win over No. 12 East Carolina last Saturday, Picard, a 6-foot-2, 185-pound right-hander, picked up the win after pitching 2-1/3 innings of aimless relief. Bryant won all three games at East Carolina and became the first Northeastern Conference baseball team to sweep a three-game series against a nationally ranked opponent.

Picard, a T&G Super Team selection, helped Auburn win the Division 3 championship as a rookie and finished his high school career 10-2, with a 1.42 ERA and 107 strikeouts. He pitched 12 innings out of the bullpen for Hartford and went 1-3 his first season.

Tyler Mudd, Holy Cross (Shrewsbury/St. John’s High/Deerfield Academy)

Freshman, Pitcher/Outfielder

The 5-foot-8, 165-pound southpaw Mudd made his first college start in Game 1 of the Crusaders’ doubleheader in Troy last Saturday. It was a tough outing for Mudd, who allowed 11 earned runs in 4⅓ innings, and a tough weekend for HC, who gave up all four games at Troy, but Mudd plans to play a key role on the pitching team. of Holy Cross this spring, while also seeing time in the outfield.

In each of HC’s other games this past weekend, Mudd started in center field, hit the first hit and had three hits.

After playing for two years at St. John’s, where he was a reserve on the Pioneers’ Division 1A state title team in 2017 and a starting pitcher and one of the Pioneers’ top sophomore hitters, Mudd has transferred to Deerfield Academy.

At Deerfield, Mudd earned New England Baseball Journal New England Second-Team honors in 2020 and 2021.

John West, Boston College (Shrewsbury/Shrewsbury High

Second year, pitcher

The 6-foot-8, 250-pound West, a right-hander, made his first career start for the Eagles against Austin Peay last weekend. West allowed 6 earned runs on 5 hits, walked 3 and struck out 3 in 3⅓ innings and did not consider the call. Austin Peay outlasted the Eagles, 18-17.

As a BC rookie, West made 10 appearances out of the bullpen and went 1-0 with 11 strikeouts in 9⅔ innings of work.

West, who was a T&G Super Team winner in baseball and basketball, led Shrewsbury to his first Division 1 Finals appearance in 19 years as a junior, when he went 3-2 with an 0 ERA, 87 and 45 strikeouts and 15 walks in 32⅓ innings.

He played for the Shrewsbury Post 397 team that made it to the American Legion World Series.

Kevin Skagerlind, UMass (Holden/Wachusett Regional)

Second year, outfielder

Skagerlind, the former Wachusett tri-sport star (baseball, soccer, hockey), had an immediate impact last season for the Minutemen. He saw action in 42 games with 39 starts in center and right field, made no mistakes and led the team with 15 stolen bases. The 6-foot, 195-pound Skagerlind hit .239.

UMass opens the 2022 season on March 4 in Georgetown.

Skagerlind, considered one of the best all-around athletes in Wachusett history, scored more than 100 points in football and hockey, leading those teams to three combined Central Mass titles. as well as a state hockey championship. He helped the Mountaineers qualify for the 2018 Super 8 baseball tournament.

Skagerlind was the home team’s 2020 Male Athlete of the Year.

Jonathan Santucci, Duke (Leominster/Philips Andover)

Freshman, Pitcher/Outfielder

Prior to the season, Duke coach Chris Pollard called Santucci “one of the most talented two-way players in college baseball”.

The 6-foot-2, 200-pound Santucci, who bats and throws on the left, hit .322 in his career at Philips Andover, made a few pitching appearances, was a 2021 Perfect Game All-American first team and ranked as one of the Top 60 rookies in the nation and second overall from Massachusetts.

In his collegiate debut last weekend, Santucci faced three batters in the seventh inning of the Blue Devils’ 8-7 victory over VMI.

Santucci, who participated in the inaugural MLB Draft Combine last summer, is part of Duke’s newcomer class (freshmen and transfers) that D1Baseball.com ranked 10th nationally.

Matt Shaw, Maryland (Brimfield Academy/Worcester)

Second year, infielder

After earning Freshman All-American honors from Perfect Game and Collegiate Baseball in 2021, Shaw started his sophomore season with a sizzling performance in the Terrapins’ three-game sweep against Baylor.

Shaw, Maryland’s starting shortstop and No. 3 batter, hit .538 with 2 home runs and 5 RBIs.

Last season, the 5-foot-11, 185-pound Shaw, who earned Big Ten All-Freshman accolades, started 45 games and led the team and ranked seventh in the Big Ten. with a batting average of .332. He also led the Terrapins with 61 hits and 16 doubles.

Shaw played at Worcester Academy and helped the Hilltoppers reach the semi-finals of the Central New England Prep School baseball tournament in his junior season.

Barry Walsh, Boston College (Sterling/Wachusett Regional)

Junior, outfielder/thrower

Walsh showed his versatility for the Eagles as an outfielder, DH and relief pitcher.

In last weekend’s 2022 home opener at Austin Peay, Walsh started all three games at center, had four hits and drove in a run.

The 6-foot, 195-pound, two-time T&G Super Team winner played 15 games last season with four outfield starts. He batted .200 and had a .385 slugging percentage.

As a freshman in BC, Walsh, a right-hander, made four appearances out of the bullpen.

In his senior season at Wachusett, Walsh went 3-1 with a 2.21 ERA and 31 strikeouts, while batting .364 and on defense.

Cross Jenkins, New Jersey Institute of Technology (Barre/Quabbin Regional)

Second year, pitcher

Jenkins pitched 3⅓ scoreless innings and took the victory in relief as NJIT beat Bellarmine, 9-3, last Saturday.

Last season, Jenkins, a 6-foot-4, 205-pound right-hander, tied for the second-most appearances of any NJIT pitcher with 14, all out of the bullpen. Prior to the NCAA Tournament, he did not allow a run in seven straight appearances.

He hit a season-high five batters in a scoreless 3⅔ innings against UMBC. Jenkins finished 2-0 with one save and a 5.33 ERA.

His junior season at Quabbin, Jenkins threw two hits and went 7-1 with a .41 ERA, 76 strikeouts and 14 walks in 56⅓ innings.

Tyler Nielsen, Maine (Grafton/St. John’s High)

Second year, pitcher

As a freshman, Nielsen went 2-2 with a 4.40 ERA. In his best performance of the season, Nielsen pitched six scoreless innings and struck out five to earn a victory over Albany and help the Black Bears earn a berth in the America East tournament.

Nielsen, a 6-foot-3, 195-pound southpaw, has made eight appearances and four starts in 2021, struck out 24 and walked 11 in 28⅔ innings.

Nielsen was a Central Mass star. Conference in St. John’s in 2019.

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Coaches team up to create a pathway for young baseball players https://timothompson.com/coaches-team-up-to-create-a-pathway-for-young-baseball-players/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 21:19:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/coaches-team-up-to-create-a-pathway-for-young-baseball-players/ ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) — In 2015, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred launched the sport Play ball youth initiative. The aim was to reverse the downward trend in youth participation. A clinic was held Saturday to help build community and communication from tee-ball to college baseball. The event was held at Lee County High School(WALB) […]]]>

ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) — In 2015, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred launched the sport Play ball youth initiative.

The aim was to reverse the downward trend in youth participation.

A clinic was held Saturday to help build community and communication from tee-ball to college baseball.

The event was held at Lee County High School(WALB)

“We want to make sure that coaches in this field have the resources to be successful and that the baseball field is teaching the game the right way,” said Scot Hemmings, head baseball coach at Washington State University. ‘Albany.

Head baseball coach at Lee County High School, Brian Trivette appreciates Hemmings for the initiative to help organize this type of event.

“It’s so important to our community with baseball and any community across the country to have communication and a connection between youth, recreational baseball through the high school curriculum and into local colleges. Working together is fantastic and can help build community,” Trivette said.

This clinic will be much more than a one-time event.

ASU Head Coach Scot Hemmings Hosts Coaching Clinic
ASU Head Coach Scot Hemmings Hosts Coaching Clinic(WALB)

“We are going to do more in the winter and fall and spread the knowledge. We have a clinic every November, we bring in great speakers. We just want to make sure coaches in this area have the resources to be successful,” says Hemmings.

They also went over the essentials of being a coach at the clinic.

“How to run a practice, some basic hitting drills. Basic for mentors to deal with parents, just basic stuff just to give them a little advice,” says Trivette.

Coaches believe that recreational baseball with youth is an essential tool in teaching youth the game.

“I believe recreational baseball is one component, a huge component to making your kid better. You can take a great travel ball kid and bring them into our program and teach them things like confidence. You can teach them things like leadership,” says Jamie Knight.

“Even take a kid who hits the nine holes of a good quality travel ball team and put him on the three together here and play baseball and let him start leading the others,” he said. he adds.

Feb. 5 will be the last day to register for youth baseball in Lee County.

To register your child, click on here.

Copyright 2022 WALB. All rights reserved.

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Daron Schoenrock – Head Coach – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/daron-schoenrock-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 06:00:28 +0000 https://timothompson.com/daron-schoenrock-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ Hired on June 29, 2004, Daron Schoenrock becomes the 16and Head coach in baseball’s long history at the University of Memphis. After a seven-year stint as a top assistant and pitching coach at three Southeastern Conference schools (Kentucky 1998, 1999, Georgia 2000, 2001, and Mississippi State 2002, 2003, 2004), Schoenrock immediately began to put his […]]]>

Hired on June 29, 2004, Daron Schoenrock becomes the 16and Head coach in baseball’s long history at the University of Memphis. After a seven-year stint as a top assistant and pitching coach at three Southeastern Conference schools (Kentucky 1998, 1999, Georgia 2000, 2001, and Mississippi State 2002, 2003, 2004), Schoenrock immediately began to put his fingerprints on the program. including enhancing recruiting efforts to a more national reach, building the Bullpen Club to increase revenue to support program growth, and launching a subscription campaign to increase fan appeal to see the Tigers compete in the ever-competitive baseball environment of Conference USA.

After experiencing a difficult campaign in his first season (2005), Schoenrock and his team entered a recruiting class that led them to 2n/a record biggest NCAA Baseball Division I turnaround in 2006 with a 32-28 record, which included a 2-2 finish in the C-USA Tournament. The 2007 campaign saw the Tigers finish 36-27 with a 3-2 performance in the C-USA Tournament, which included a win over then-ranked No. 2 Rice to push the Tigers into the semi-finals of the tournament. The Tigers were selected as an all-around team for the NCAA program’s first regional birth (Nashville Regional at Vanderbilt) since the 1994 season and that momentum initiated plans to improve facilities at Nat Buring Field.

“Starting over” with a group of talented freshmen in 2008, the Tigers secured a senior grant commitment from FedEx to renovate the facility in what is now known as FedExPark. Plans were made during the 2008 and 2009 seasons that found the Tigers without a “home park”, as they played their entire 2009 season on the road, which included all of the C-USA weekend series at the USA Stadium in Millington.

Memphis moved into FedExPark just a week before the end of the 2010 campaign with a 21-32 record, which set the tone for a five-year (2011-2015) streak of more than 30 winning seasons, including a record 37-21 in 2015. In 2013, Schoenrock was named C-USA Coach of the Year, an award voted on by his C-USA coaching peers. Schoenrock led the Tigers to eight 30-plus seasons, second only to Bobby Kilpatrick’s fourteen 30-plus seasons during his 21 years at the helm.

In 2017, Schoenrock led efforts to upgrade FedExPark with a team meeting room (the Al Brown Meeting Room) and on-site coaching offices to give the coaching staff better access to players and their development. This improvement to the facility led to the baseball building being renamed “The Babe Howard Training Facility”, led by a senior donation from Ray and Laura Rosas (daughter of the late Babe Howard). The Tigers now enjoy a state-of-the-art baseball building to call home. Schoenrock is actively involved in upcoming facility renovation plans, which include conversion to an all-grass pitch, a new scoreboard and seating upgrades, all of which are expected to begin in the summer of 2022.

Schoenrock launched his coaching career in 1985, when he served as a graduate assistant/pitching coach under David Mays at his Alma Mater, Tennessee Tech University, after enjoying a four-year career as a mainstay in the rotation of Golden Eagles pitchers (1981 -1984). Schoenrock then moved to Murray State University to serve as a pitching coach under the late Johnny Reagan (ABCA Hall of Famer) in 1986 and 1987. In the summer of 1987, Schoenrock joined future mentor Brian Shoop as a coach Bryan Packers pitchers. (College Summer Team, Starkville, Mississippi). Schoenrock then accepted the head coaching position at Lincoln Memorial University and served two seasons there (1988, 1989) and was named the 1989 Tennessee Valley Athletic Conference Coach of the Year. This success led to “joining” Brian Shoop as his top assistant (when Shoop left his position as assistant coach at Mississippi State to become the head coach of Birmingham-Southern College) in the summer. 1989. During their eight years together in Birmingham. , the Panthers enjoyed remarkable success with a 322-139 overall record in those eight seasons and a trip to the NAIA World Series in 1995.

Schoenrock earned his first nomination in the very difficult Southeastern Conference (SEC) with a move to the University of Kentucky in the summer of 1989 to join ABCA Hall of Famer Keith Madison as a launch coach/recruitment coordinator. At Kentucky, Schoenrock mentored a youngster Brandon Webb, who won Major League Baseball’s National League Cy Young Award in 2007. Another mainstay of those Kentucky teams included future Major League infielder Andy Green (former San Diego Padres manager). Kentucky earned SEC Tournament berths in each of Schoenrock’s two years at Lexington.

In the summer of 1999, ABCA Hall of Famer and SEC Dean of Coaching Ron Polk came out of retirement from Mississippi State and agreed to take charge of rebuilding the program at the University of Georgia. Polk immediately summoned Schoenrock to Athens from Lexington to help with this rebuilding effort and after a return to the SEC Tournament in 2000, the 2001 Bulldogs won the SEC Championship. Georgia went on to host and win an NCAA Regional, beat Florida State in a thrilling Super Regional in Athens, and qualified for the 2001 College World Series in Omaha to put an emphatic stamp on their two years in Athens. .

With work in Mississippi State “open” again, Polk returned to Starkville in the summer of 2001 to lead the legendary program and Schoenrock accompanied him there for an impressive three-year two-regional run, hosting regional in 2003). Notable Bulldog pitchers Jonathan Papelbon and Paul Maholm (7and overall pick in the 2003 MLB Draft) honed their craft under Schoenrock in Starkville. Schoenrock’s experiences under Brian Shoop, Keith Madison, and Ron Polk led to his emergence as the lead candidate for the University of Memphis vacancy in the summer of 2004 and his tenure at Memphis began. .

In his 37 years as a college baseball coach, Schoenrock coached 110 players who transitioned to professional baseball, including 68 pitchers. Among those numbers are the 39 Tigers who had the opportunity to transition to the professional ranks during his 17 years in Memphis (including 26 pitchers), including recent Major League Tigers Jacob Wilson and Sam Moll. In addition, three Tigers (Chad Zurcher, 2011 C-USA Player of the Year, Jacob Wilson, 2012 C-USA Player of the Year and Erik Schoenrock, 2013 C-USA Pitcher of the Year) were elected by the conference coaches as Player or Pitcher of the Year.

Schoenrock teams also continue to excel off the pitch. His teams have posted 20 consecutive semesters with at least a 3.0 team GPA and have always been very active in the community partnering with The Down’s Syndrome of Memphis on their annual Step-Up Walk, The Forever Young Veterans Association , Ronald McDonald House’s annual radiothon. , and the Germantown Community Center after-school program at various Germantown elementary schools.

Schoenrock authored a pitching instructional book titled “The Total Pitching Program” in 1995 and has spoken at various national coaching clinics, including the prestigious ABCA National Clinic in 1999. In the summer of 1995, Schoenrock got a sabbatical from Birmingham-Southern College as he was hired as a pitching coach for the Bristol White Sox (a short-season subsidiary of the Chicago White Sox). He served for six years on the ABCA committee for the prestigious Lefty Gomez Award and was president of the American Athletic Conference baseball coaches from 2014-2017. He is currently the staff liaison for The Fellowship of Christian Athletes for the University of Memphis.

Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and raised (1st elementary through high school) in Fayetteville, Tennessee, Schoenrock was an all-district quarterback and pitcher and a 1980 graduate of Lincoln County High School. He received a BS in Secondary Education/Biology from Tennessee Tech in 1984 and a Masters in Secondary Education/Biology from Murray State University in 1987. He is married to Carol Cawood Schoenrock and they have two sons, Erik and Bret. Erik (former pitcher for the Tiger and San Diego Padres organization) is currently the head baseball coach at Southwest Tennessee Community College, while Bret attends Southwest Tennessee Community College and serves as the Director of Baseball/COO of equipment.

Major Leagues Coached: Brandon Webb, Andy Green, Jeff Keppinger, Jonathan Papelbon, Paul Maholm, Alan Johnson, Craig Tatum, Sam Moll, Jacob Wilson

SCHOENROCK TRAINING TIMELINE
2005-present: University of Memphis (head coach)
2002-04: Mississippi State (assistant coach)
2000-01: University of Georgia (assistant coach)
1998-99: University of Kentucky (assistant coach)
1995: Chicago White Sox organization (pitching coach)
1990-97: Birmingham Southern (assistant coach)
1988-89: Lincoln Memorial High School (head coach)
1986-87: Murray State (graduate assistant)
1985: Tennessee Tech (graduate assistant)
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Jimmy Ricklefsen – Assistant Coach – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/jimmy-ricklefsen-assistant-coach-baseball-coaches/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 14:32:42 +0000 https://timothompson.com/jimmy-ricklefsen-assistant-coach-baseball-coaches/ Jimmy Ricklefsen is entering his 16th year overall at McNeese as a player, assistant coach and head coach. He returned home in 2016 to join the Cowboys staff after spending the previous 19 years on Lamar’s staff. He serves as scouting coordinator, alumni relations, field coach, and first base coach while assisting batters. Ricklefsen has […]]]>

Jimmy Ricklefsen is entering his 16th year overall at McNeese as a player, assistant coach and head coach. He returned home in 2016 to join the Cowboys staff after spending the previous 19 years on Lamar’s staff. He serves as scouting coordinator, alumni relations, field coach, and first base coach while assisting batters.

Ricklefsen has a storied past as he coached baseball in the Southland Conference for 35 years, the most years in conference history. As head coach, he led the McNeese program to its most successful season in program history with a 41-16 record in 1995. He was on every McNeese championship-winning team, except for 2000 and 2006.

Before returning home to McNeese, Ricklefsen served 19 years on Lamar’s staff, including six as an associate head coach, helped guide the Cardinals to two conference championships, two league tournament titles and six appearances in NCAA Regionals. He was the scouting coordinator in addition to coaching third base, working with infielders, defensive lineup, and assisting batters.

Ricklefsen’s achievements:
2021 Southland Conference Tournament Champion
2021 NCAA Fort Worth (TCU) Regional Appearance
2019 Southland Conference Tournament Champion
2019 Nashville (Vanderbilt) NCAA Regional Appearance

2017 Southland Conference Champions
1993 Southland Conference Champions
1993 NCAA Central Regional Appearance (Texas A&M)

1988 Southland Conference Champions
1988 NCAA Midwest Regional Appearance (Oklahoma State)
(At McNeese)

2010 Southland Conference Tournament Champion
2010 NCAA Fort Worth (TCU) Regional Appearance

2004 Southland Conference Champions

2004 Southland Conference Tournament Champions
2004 NCAA Regional Appearance Austin (Texas)
2003 Southland Conference Champions
2003 NCAA Regional Appearance Austin (Texas)
2002 Southland Conference Tournament Champion
2002 NCAA Houston (Rice) Regional Appearance
(At Lamar)

In his time at McNeese and Lamar he recruited and coached:
• 106 players selected in the MLB Entry Draft
• 10 major league baseball players
• 21 All Americans
• 166 All-Conference players
• Seven SLC Hitters of the Year
• Six SLC launchers of the year
• Newcomers of the year in six leagues
• Nine players in the 90’s Southland Conference team of the decade and 11 players in the ’00 team.

Ricklefsen graduated from McNeese in 1986 and served as an assistant coach under the late legendary Tony Robichaux from 1987 to 1994, helping the Cowboys to their first-ever Southland Conference championship in 1988 and two NCAA Regionals appearances (1988, 1993).

After spending seven seasons as an assistant coach under Robichaux (1988-94) and one as a graduate assistant under Nolan Viator (1987), Ricklefsen was named McNeese’s head coach before the 1995 season. He posted an 81-79 record , including tying the school record for single-season wins with 41 in the 1995 campaign. The Cowboys’ 41-16 record and .719 winning percentage in a year is a school record.

As a Cowboys player from 1984 to 1986, he played in both the infield and outfield and hit .333 in his senior season. He also led the Cowboys in stolen bases for two seasons and hit 11 career homers.

He played for Wayne Graham, a member of the College Baseball Hall of Fame and former Rice University baseball head coach, at San Jacinto Junior College before transferring to McNeese.

Ricklefsen, a Houston native, served for three years on the NCAA Southern Region At-Large Baseball Advisory Committee, which recommends general teams for selection to play in NCAA regionals.

He is set to become one of 450 coaches nationwide to be inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) as a life member, with the induction ceremony scheduled for January 7, 2022. He is member for 35 years of the organization.

Ricklefsen and his wife Andrea have one daughter, Lauren. Lauren is married to Garrett Buller and the couple have two children, son Hudson and daughter Adalynn Grace.

The Rickelfsen File:
McNeese – Assistant Coach (2016–present)
Lamar – Associate Head Coach (2010-2015)
Lamar – Assistant Coach (1998-2010)
McNeese – Head Coach (1995-1997)
McNeese – Assistant Coach (1988-1994)
McNeese – Graduate Assistant (1987)

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Joey Hammond – Head Coach – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/joey-hammond-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 14:41:40 +0000 https://timothompson.com/joey-hammond-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ [ad_1] High Point University athletic director Dan Hauser announced the hiring of Joey Hammond as the head coach of the High Point baseball program on June 17, 2021. Hammond becomes the fourth head coach of the Division I era of the HPU and the eighth captain in program history. Hammond has spent the past seven […]]]>


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High Point University athletic director Dan Hauser announced the hiring of Joey Hammond as the head coach of the High Point baseball program on June 17, 2021.

Hammond becomes the fourth head coach of the Division I era of the HPU and the eighth captain in program history.

Hammond has spent the past seven seasons in the Triad as a volunteer assistant coach at Wake Forest where he has worked with hitters and outfielders. He guided 17 Demon Deacon hitters to All-ACC honors during his tenure and saw eight players recognized as All-Americans during his seven years.

Hammond made Wake Forest’s offense one of the best in the country, culminating with a 43-20 season in 2017 where the Demon Deacons were one game away from qualifying for the College World Series. That season, Wake Forest placed in the nation’s top 20 in batting average, base percentage, doubles, runs, runs per game, walks, strokes, strokes.
percentage, and home runs after becoming the first Division I school in the country to hit 100 home runs in the BBCOR bat era with a record 106 home runs.

Prior to joining Wake Forest, Hammond was head coach at Westchester Country Day School here at High Point for five seasons. He led the Wildcats to the NCISAA 2A Final Four every five years and won three state championships. He compiled a 104-31-1 record at Westchester Country Day and played 14 college baseball graduates.

Hammond played 11 years professionally before becoming a coach and was drafted in the 25th round of the 1998 MLB Draft by the Baltimore Orioles, spending eight seasons with the O organization and three in the Philadelphia Phillies farming system. His last eight seasons of his playing career have been spent at the AA and AAA levels, and he has played at least 100 games at every infield position and over 150 games in the outfield. Hammond ended his career with a .274 batting average with over 1,100 hits and was named to the 2000s All-Star team of the Reading Phillies (AA).

A regular in Tar Heel State, Hammond received a BA in Communications from Charlotte, where he was a 49ers shortstop from 1996 to 1998. He was twice a member of the All-Conference USA All-Tournament team. and was named First Team All-Conference USA in 1998 after defeating 0.398 with 100 hits.

A native of Frederick, Maryland, he was inducted into the Frederick County YMCA Hall of Fame in 2019. Hammond currently resides in Greensboro with his wife Rebecca and their three sons, Caleb, Josh and Mason.

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Five Wetumpka baseball players sign to play college baseball | Sports https://timothompson.com/five-wetumpka-baseball-players-sign-to-play-college-baseball-sports/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 21:59:28 +0000 https://timothompson.com/five-wetumpka-baseball-players-sign-to-play-college-baseball-sports/ Wetumpka High School’s baseball program sent five players to the collegiate ranks Wednesday afternoon. Kyle Morrison (Troy), Garrit Terrell (Snead State), Noah Jones (Southern Union State CC), Dawson Fuller (Southern Union State CC) and Douglas Johnson (Southern Union State CC) have each signed national letters of intent to play to the next level on Wednesday. […]]]>

Wetumpka High School’s baseball program sent five players to the collegiate ranks Wednesday afternoon.

Kyle Morrison (Troy), Garrit Terrell (Snead State), Noah Jones (Southern Union State CC), Dawson Fuller (Southern Union State CC) and Douglas Johnson (Southern Union State CC) have each signed national letters of intent to play to the next level on Wednesday.

“Having five guys enrolled in a class is very special for the program, very special for the school, the community, and it’s certainly a reflection of what they’ve been doing since they’ve been in our program,” said said Wetumpka coach Michael Dismukes. “For me, it makes me very proud of how they’ve grown from boys to men in five years and the hard work they’ve put in is incredible. Words cannot describe what each of them means to me.

Playing the hot corner, Morrison proved to be one of Alabama State’s best hitters last year. The senior third baseman hit .442 with four home runs and 36 RBIs while batting both in the middle of the lineup and as the leadoff hitter at times.

He showed his power at the plate with 25 extra hits throughout the year while striking out just 11 times.






Wetumpka third baseman Kyle Morrison signed a national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball in Troy.


Morrison has been a staple in both Wetumpka’s lineup and at third base since he started as a rookie. He started attracting interest from Troy’s coaching staff just over a year ago and signed up to play for the Trojans in August.

“Troy is just a place where, as soon as I walked onto campus, I felt like this was the place to be,” Morrison said of his decision. “I love the coaching staff. Their field is unlike any other and I really see myself succeeding there.

Terrell also had a pretty impressive junior season for the Indians last year. Wetumpka’s starting catcher finished the year with a .352 batting average, 37 hits, 9 doubles and 18 RBIs.

He was named to the Elmore County team for his efforts and then committed to playing college baseball at Snead State Community College in July. Terrell expects to compete for a starting position as soon as he enters campus, and he hopes to develop his skills to play at the Division I level and possibly get drafted to play pro ball in the future.

Snead State has a reputation for pushing players to the Division I level, and that was one of Terrell’s selling points when he made his decision.







Signature of Garrit Terrell

Wetumpka catcher Garrit Terrell signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball at Snead State Community College.


“The first thing Garrit is going to bring is toughness,” Dismukes said. “He can handle any pitching staff. The durability behind the plate and the energy he plays with every day will take him to the next level. He manages the game very well and he is the same child every day. He brings energy every day, and that’s what makes him special.

Jones quickly made up his mind to commit to Southern Union State after being offered. One day to be exact. Jones, an infielder for the Indians, was offered by SUSCC head coach Aaron Everett on Aug. 17.

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On August 18, he enlisted.

Jones is a huge threat on the base lines and one of the best defenders of any infielder in the region. He finished his junior season with a .300 batting average and 4 doubles, 2 homers, 17 RBIs and 9 stolen bases.







Signature of Noah Jones

On Wednesday, Wetumpka middle infielder Noah Jones signed his national letter of intent to play college baseball at Southern Union State Community College.


“Southern Union has great baseball facilities and a great coach,” Jones said. “They are great people and they have a great tradition for baseball. So why not Southern Union. I love Coach Everett there. It’s amazing and everything I wanted is there. Great facility. Big stadium. The fans come to support us. This is where I want to be.

Fuller was the first of the Wetumpka group to commit to playing at the college level. Fuller, a left-handed pitcher, was offered by Southern Union State CC in March and signed to play for Coach Everett and the Bison in June.







Signature of Dawson Fuller

Wetumpka pitcher Dawson Fuller signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball at Southern Union State Community College.


SUSCC first got interested in Fuller during his junior campaign, and his numbers show why. The left-hander finished his junior season with a 7-4 overall record with a 3.50 ERA and 83 strikeouts in 52 innings pitched.

His fastball is in the mid-to-high 80s, but his best pitch is a wipeout change.

“I really felt like they were really heavy on me and they really wanted me there,” Fuller said. “I always wanted to go somewhere I was wanted, so it was a pretty easy decision. I already knew the program and what a full program it was, but Coach Everett really runs the program from professional way.

Johnson will also get the chance to pitch for SUSCC and the Bison, but he’s currently committed to playing both ways in college.

Johnson jumped on Coach Everett’s radar this summer with his travel ball team, and he quickly signed on after being offered in August. He pitches for the Wetumpka team, but will get a chance to pitch and play in the outfield in college.

Last year as a junior, Johnson was 7-2 on the mound with a 2.00 ERA and 72 strikeouts. While playing center field, he averaged .300 with 26 hits, 14 RBIs, and scored 21 runs.







Signature of Douglas Johnson

Wetumpka pitcher and outfielder Douglas Johnson signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday to play college baseball at Southern Union State Community College.


“I went there for a tour and really fell in love with this campus,” Johnson said. “Of course, the coach and the team are great. I followed them for a long time, and they have an incredible baseball program. I just fell in love with them. I’m super excited to be a two-way player there. Hopefully I can play both roles big and throw well while still hitting.

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Skip Johnson – Head Coach – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/skip-johnson-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 01:29:44 +0000 https://timothompson.com/skip-johnson-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ [ad_1] Widely regarded as one of the nation’s top pitching coaches, Skip Johnson has been leading the Oklahoma baseball program since June 2017. Since taking the reign after serving a year as a pitching coach, Sooners, he led the Sooners to a 112-80 four-season record. Johnson’s influence on the program began immediately and has grown […]]]>


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Widely regarded as one of the nation’s top pitching coaches, Skip Johnson has been leading the Oklahoma baseball program since June 2017. Since taking the reign after serving a year as a pitching coach, Sooners, he led the Sooners to a 112-80 four-season record.

Johnson’s influence on the program began immediately and has grown every year. The OU pitching staff have posted a progressively lower ERA in each of their first four seasons at Norman. The Oklahoma team’s 2019 ERA of 3.92 was only the seventh under-4.00 ERA since 1980 and the first since 2015. In its first two seasons, the Sooners pitchers have posted two of the five best strikeouts in program history. A total of 15 pitchers have heard their names spoken in the Major League Baseball Draft in the past four years.

In the shortened 2020 season due to COVID-19, the Sooners compiled a 14-4 record and climbed to 9th in national polls. In the process, OU has achieved historic performance. Dane Acker pitched Oklahoma’s first individual hitting goal scorer since 1989 against No.11 LSU in the Shriners College Classic, and the pitching staff combined for a Big 12-record 21 strikeouts in one. game against Arkansas-Pine Bluff. Cade Cavalli became the OU’s 10th first-round pick in the June Major League Baseball regular draft when he was selected 22nd overall. A program record, four Sooners were drafted in the first four rounds, including all three weekend rotation pitchers (Cavalli, Levi Prater and Acker).

Johnson coached OU until the program’s 38th regional appearance in the NCAA in 2018. The Sooners posted a 38-25 record – the highest winning tally since 2013 – and reached the Tallahassee Regional final. In the process, the Oklahoma pitchers set a school record with 608 strikeouts. Outfielder Steele Walker was named a member of the U.S. second all-star team by Baseball America and the NCBWA, and pitcher Levi Prater was selected as a freshman by the college baseball team. Outfielder Kyler Murray, who won the 2018 Heisman Trophy with the OU football team, was the ninth overall overall in the 2018 MLB Draft. Nine players were drafted, including five in the first 10 rounds ( Walker in the second round, pitcher Jake Irvin in the fourth round, pitcher Austin Hansen in the eighth round and outfielder Cade Harris in the 10th round).

The Oklahoma pitchers surrendered the fewest homers in the Big 12 conference in 2017 and combined for 531 strikeouts to rank fourth in the league and fourth in OU’s single-season history. The Sooners’ 9.26 strikeouts per nine innings placed second in the conference. As a team, OU pitchers have struck out 10 or more batters 24 times.

The earlier pitchers combined 17 starts of six or more innings in 2017, including the Louisville Regional’s first two games. Three Oklahoma pitchers were selected in the 2017 MLB Draft. Earlier, JB Olson was drafted in the 10th round to extend a seven-year streak with an Oklahoma player selected in the first 10 rounds. . OU saw starter Devon Perez and reliever Vincenzo Aiello selected on Day 3 of the draft.

Prior to coming to Oklahoma, Johnson spent a 25-year coaching career in the State of Texas, including the last 10 years as an assistant and associate head coach at the University of Texas.

Johnson was hired as the Texas pitching coach for the 2007 season under the leadership of Augie Garrido, who resigned his post as varsity baseball’s most successful coach in May 2016 to take on a new role in the league. UT athletics department. In 10 seasons, Johnson has helped the Longhorns to seven regional NCAA appearances, four Super Regionals and three College World Series appearances.

During his tenure in Austin, 32 pitchers from Texas were selected in the MLB Draft, including 14 in the first 10 rounds and three first-round picks. Johnson also oversaw the development of six Longhorn pitchers that reached the big leagues. The Texas pitching staff have produced a team-earned run average of less than 3.00 on five occasions and have beaten better than 7.5 by nine innings in five of their past eight seasons. As Texas hit their second CWS with Johnson on the staff in 2011, their pitchers led the Big 12 in ERA (2.35), batting average against (0.198) and strikeouts per nine innings (8 , 28).

Prior to his time in Austin, Johnson was head coach for 13 years at Navarro College of the Texas Eastern Athletic Conference of the NJCAA. From 1994 to 2006, he led the Bulldogs to 13 NJCAA Regional Championships, nine TEAC Championships and four Regional titles while recording 450 wins.

Johnson has mentored a number of players outside of those he coached at OU, UT and Navarro, working regularly with three-time Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Homer Bailey of the Kansas Oakland Athletics and Chris Davis of the Baltimore Orioles, among others.

An outstanding baseball player at Denton High School, Johnson began his varsity career at Ranger (Texas) College. After a two-year career there, Johnson switched to playing baseball at the University of North Texas in 1988 before the school dropped out of its baseball program. He finished his college playing career at UT-Pan American, wrote for the Broncs in 1989, and graduated with his BA in 1990. Johnson received a Masters of Education from UT-Tyler in 1993.

A native of Denton, Texas, Johnson and his wife, Cathy, have two sons, Tyler and Garrett.

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“Something You Dreamed About As A Kid” – Cal Poly Baseball Players Sign To MLB Teams https://timothompson.com/something-you-dreamed-about-as-a-kid-cal-poly-baseball-players-sign-to-mlb-teams/ Fri, 10 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/something-you-dreamed-about-as-a-kid-cal-poly-baseball-players-sign-to-mlb-teams/ The 2021 Major League Baseball (MLB) freshman draft proved to be another success for Cal Poly, with pitchers Bryan Woo and Andrew Alvarez being selected in the 20-round draft and catcher Myles Emmerson being signed as as an undrafted free agent. This is the 22nd straight year a Cal Poly baseball player has been drafted, […]]]>

The 2021 Major League Baseball (MLB) freshman draft proved to be another success for Cal Poly, with pitchers Bryan Woo and Andrew Alvarez being selected in the 20-round draft and catcher Myles Emmerson being signed as as an undrafted free agent.

This is the 22nd straight year a Cal Poly baseball player has been drafted, a streak dating back to 1999 that also spans head coach Larry Lee’s 19-year career.

The three players, who have now all signed contracts with their major league teams, now bring Lee’s total number of players signed to 76 since he began his tenure in 2002.

Woo, the sophomore right-hander, was selected 174th overall by the Seattle Mariners while Alvarez, the junior left-hander, was selected 353rd overall by the Washington Nationals. Emmerson signed shortly after the draft with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Also of note in this year’s MLB draft, Cal Poly baseball rookie Cameron Butler of Big Valley Christian High School in Modesto, Calif., was taken by the Chicago White Sox in the 15th round of the repechage. He signed a contract worth $150,000 with the American League franchise and will not attend Cal Poly this fall.

The three Mustangs must now battle the increasingly competitive minor league system in order to achieve the dream of nearly every college baseball player: a shot at the major league club.

Myles Emmerson

Emmerson graduated from Cal Poly with a long list of honors to his name, including the Cal Poly John Orton Golden Glove Award. He was also a first-team All-Big West member and shared the Big West Defensive Player of the Year award with CSU Northridge’s Denzel Clarke and UC Irvine’s Taishi Nakawake.

The red-shirted elder from Spring Valley, Calif., said the day the angels called him was a day he spent his whole life working for.

“Words can’t describe the excitement,” Emmerson said.

Emmerson, who started in all 56 games last season, is part of an interesting class of rookies for Anaheim, with the Angels using their 20 pitching picks.

Knowing that most of his peers entering the organization are pitchers, Emmerson said he’s optimistic about what this means for him.

“It’s a great opportunity to work with a great pitching team and ultimately help them grow as I grow in the process,” Emmerson said. “The Angels have a great history of bringing out strong receivers. After being with the organization for a few weeks, I think I fit in very well.

Emmerson put up huge numbers in the 2021 season, batting over .300. He also led the Big West Conference in picks with five and had a .991 field percentage behind the plate.

Emmerson, who will start with the Angels’ low-A affiliate, the Inland Empire 66ers, said he thinks his ability to be a leader on defense will be what sets him apart from other prospects.

“I think my leadership on the field and in the bullpen is a bonus to my own talent,” Emmerson said. “Catching is a priority position in defense and I proved that I could defend behind the dish.”

The former history major leaves Cal Poly with a .288 career batting average after starting in 148 of the 168 games he has played for the university.

Emmerson said he would miss the atmosphere of Baggett Stadium and his favorite part of playing Cal Poly was the friends he made as a Mustang.

“My teammates are an exceptional group of guys and we will be friends for a very long time,” Emmerson said. “Sharing the experience with them through the ups and downs is something I will never forget. Those five years were the best years of my life.

Andre Alvarez

Alvarez leaves Cal Poly with his own list of accolades, earning an All-Big West honorable mention last spring as well as the 2021 Mike Krukow Outstanding Pitcher Award.

Alvarez described the day he was drafted as anti-climactic, and that it didn’t settle into the fact that he was now part of MLB until he met the team.

“Day three of the draft, they don’t show it on TV, so it didn’t really strike me,” Alvarez said. “I celebrated with my family but when I arrived [to team facilities], that’s when it really started to sink in. The Nationals really wanted me.

Alvarez, who in three full seasons with the Mustangs (plus the shortened 2020 season) posted an 11-8 record, is part of a Nationals draft class that includes nine other pitchers, three of whom are left-handers like Alvarez.

Joining the major league team in the nation’s capital seemed “obvious” to Alvarez, who mentioned the organization considered him to be of higher value than any other team heading into draft day on July 13.

Alvarez is optimistic about the Nationals, saying, “I know it’s a good organization, the type that really cares about their players and their development.”

The redshirted junior from Los Alamitos, Calif., brings quite a bit of talent to the Florida Nationals rookie squad, with his final season at Cal Poly highlighted with a 7-3 record and 81 strikeouts in 88 ⅓ innings pitched.

Specifically, with a 12-out game against UC Riverside and an all-out game against UC Davis in which he allowed just one run, Alvarez has shown scouts this season that he doesn’t just have potential, but that he progressed in his four years on the central coast.

On his potential within the Nationals system, Alvarez went into detail about why the team selected a player like him.

“They’re not necessarily looking for the top performing guys in college,” Alvarez said. “I’m six-foot-three, left-handed, and have four different terrains that I’m proficient on. My breaking ball is my best shot. They can see all that potential.

Alvarez has also improved tremendously in the 2021 season after starting 3-2 with a 6.75 ERA, setting a 4-1 record and 2.75 ERA in his last eight starts on the bump. .

The factors that made the difference in Alvarez’s turnaround and his overall success at Cal Poly are attributed to the way head coach Lee handles the baseball program. Alvarez described it as a “huge combination of things” that add up to make Cal Poly a school “that gets guys in.”

Looking back on his time with the Mustangs, Alvarez’s highlight was a 2018 game when Cal Poly played then-No. 4 ranked Arkansas. As a freshman near the bottom of the depth chart, he closed in on the eighth inning with runners in scoring position, looking to keep the game tied.

Alvarez made the crucial takedown that gave Cal Poly the opportunity to take the lead in the top of the ninth, then took the team out in order in the ninth to secure the upset on the ranked Razorbacks.

Alvarez said this game highlighted his time in college because “it showed me that I belong [at Cal Poly]. I belong to division 1 baseball.

As for what he’s going to miss, Alvarez agreed with Emmerson that it’s the college baseball folks.

“Cal Poly is my home,” Alvarez said. “It’s the biggest city in California and it was the best four years of my life.”

Bryan Woo

Although his time at Cal Poly was short, Woo showed enough promise as a right-handed pitcher to be drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the sixth round.

Getting caught in the first 10 rounds is a major achievement for any player, as it’s a big indicator that a team thinks you have real ability to play in the majors sooner rather than later.

“I feel very lucky and grateful to be in this position,” Woo said. “There’s no way I’m in this position without God and the amazing people around me.”

Woo’s story of how he found out he was recruited by the Mariners is unique, finding out the news while on vacation in Hawai’i.

“Luckily my teammate Cole Cabrera lives in O’ahu so he was kind enough to let me and my family spend the day at his house,” Woo said during the Draft Day festivities. “It was really nice to have family and friends for that day and at that time.”

Draft day is something Woo has been looking forward to for a long time.

“That day and that moment is something you dream of as a kid, so there’s really no way to describe it, but it was an unforgettable experience and I’m so happy to have them with me,” said said Woo.

A look at Woo’s stat line won’t tell you much, with a career win-loss record of 4-7 and an ERA above 3.5 during his three seasons at Cal Poly. But the devil is in the details with a player like Woo, especially since two of his three seasons with the green and gold were cut short due to the pandemic in 2020 and an unfortunate elbow injury during the April series against Long Beach State that ruled out the right-hander. for the remainder of the 2021 season.

However, despite several shortened seasons, Seattle felt confident in Woo and signed him to a contract worth over $300,000 according to Cal Poly Athletics.

“I’m thrilled to play for the Mariners,” Woo said. “The main reason for this is their ability to develop a detailed process on how I can improve and grow.”

And that’s what Woo says makes him unique from those around him in the draft – his ability to improve.

“My pitching composition with my size, strength, mobility and ability, combined with my potential for improvement, is what made me a unique prospect compared to other players,” Woo said.

Some of that ability was seen before his premature exit in the 2021 season, when he was a takedown machine with 42K in just 28 innings.

Woo is rehabilitating with the team at their spring training facility in Arizona, while SB Nation’s Kate Preusser reports that the former business administration major is set to undergo Tommy John surgery in the near future. to come up.

When he returns to the mound for Seattle, Woo will be looking to repeat performances like his stellar performances in wins over CSU Northridge and Long Beach State last season, where he struck out seven and eight, respectively, without allowing a single. point.

Although he was only on the Central Coast for three years, Woo says the bonds he made during that time will be what he will miss the most.

“I will definitely miss the guys on the team the most and those relationships we’ve built over the past few years,” Woo said. “I’ll be friends with some of these guys for the rest of my life.”

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Pamplin Media Group – Barlow appoints new wrestling and baseball coaches https://timothompson.com/pamplin-media-group-barlow-appoints-new-wrestling-and-baseball-coaches/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/pamplin-media-group-barlow-appoints-new-wrestling-and-baseball-coaches/ [ad_1] Rod Heiser and Brady Burdick bring their experience to the Bruins’ track and field and their goal of shaping their character. Two coaches bring their expertise and passion to Barlow High athletics as the Bruins hired new wrestling and baseball coaches. Rod Heiser is Barlow’s wrestling coach, while Brady Burdick is the baseball coach. […]]]>


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Rod Heiser and Brady Burdick bring their experience to the Bruins’ track and field and their goal of shaping their character.

Two coaches bring their expertise and passion to Barlow High athletics as the Bruins hired new wrestling and baseball coaches.

Rod Heiser is Barlow’s wrestling coach, while Brady Burdick is the baseball coach.

Heiser is a known face in high school – he has 16 years of experience coaching at Barlow, Gordon Russell Middle School and the Barlow Mat Club.

“I love working with wrestlers of all ages and skill levels – it’s a great sport that builds character,” said Heiser. “Probably the best thing about wrestling is that anyone can come out for wrestling regardless of their gender, size or experience.”

Heiser wrestled collegially at the Big Ten Conference at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and earned a degree in economics. He grew up immersed in sports. His father and brothers wrestled in Dartmouth, Cornell and in the state of Oregon.

He currently lives in Troutdale with his wife and three college-aged children. When he’s not a coach, he enjoys playing ice hockey and working in the garden.

COURTESY PHOTO: BARLOW HIGH SCHOOL - Brady BurdickBurdick takes the reigns of baseball from the Bruins after joining the team as an associate head coach in 2018. Each year with Barlow, he has helped lead the team to the playoffs – a trend he plans to continue. .

“The winning culture and history of striving for excellence – on the ground, in the classroom and in the community – provide an excellent foundation on which to build and will continue to be the core values ​​of the program into the future. Burdick said. “There is an excitement around the program that starts with our players but is fueled by the support of this wealthy baseball family.”

Burdick played four years of college baseball at Lakeridge High School, earning a scholarship to play college ball at Northwest Nazarene University. He returned to Lakeridge to coach from 2011-2014. He also served as a varsity coach at Jesuit High School when the team defeated Oregon City in the 2016 OSAA State Championship game.


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Elliott Avent – Head Coach – Baseball Coaches https://timothompson.com/elliott-avent-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 16:07:57 +0000 https://timothompson.com/elliott-avent-head-coach-baseball-coaches/ During 25 seasons as baseball head coach at NC State, Elliott Avent shaped the Wolfpack into one of the best and most consistent programs in the nation. Since being hired in 1996, Avent, who is NC State’s winningest coach with 926 wins (1,150 in his 33-year coaching career), has taken the Wolfpack to the NCAA […]]]>

During 25 seasons as baseball head coach at NC State, Elliott Avent shaped the Wolfpack into one of the best and most consistent programs in the nation. Since being hired in 1996, Avent, who is NC State’s winningest coach with 926 wins (1,150 in his 33-year coaching career), has taken the Wolfpack to the NCAA Tournament in 19 of the last 25 seasons and 14 of the last 17. Avent won ACC and National Coach of the Year honors in 2003 and was named USA Baseball’s 2021 College Coach of the Year.

He joined an elite group on February 14, 2020 as he earned his 1,100th career victory with a 4-0 result against James Madison at Doak Field. He is one of 10 active head coaches to break the mark, as he currently holds an overall record of 1,150-762. On April 6, 2021, Avent reached the 900 win milestone at NC State with a 13-2 rout of App State at Doak Field.

After a shortened 2020 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Avent, who was named ABCA/Rawlings Atlantic Region Coach of the Year and USA Baseball College Coach of the Year, brought the Wolfpack back to the College World Series in 2021. It was the third in program history and the first since 2013. Despite a slow 4-9 (1-8 ACC) start, the 2021 team has had one of the most historic seasons and most memorable in NC State baseball history, as it finished the regular season with a 28-15 record, winning 24 of its last 30 games, and closing conference play with a 19-14 record for finish third overall in the ACC. After claiming the No. 3 seed in the ACC Tournament, the Pack reached their first title game since 2015 with victories over Pittsburgh and Georgia Tech before suffering a 1-0 loss to 2021 ACC champion Duke.


After earning its 10th NCAA regional bid in the past 11 seasons, NC State won 3-0 in the NCAA Ruston Regional to earn the fifth-place all-time NCAA Super Regional against seeded Arkansas. series, in Fayetteville, Ark. all three games with the Razorbacks, NC State dropped their opener, 21-2, then created history by earning 6-5, 3-2 wins to become the first team in super region history to qualify for the College World Series after losing game one by 15 or more runs. The Pack won 10-6 and 1-0 over Stanford and Vanderbilt respectively, and were one win away from qualifying for the Championship Series in Omaha before being eliminated from the tournament due to COVID-19 protocols, and tied his best result. in program history with a #3 national ranking.

In the 2021 season, Avent saw seven league-leading players earn All-ACC honors and five top performers earn All-ACC Academic Team honors, headlined by Jonny Butler, Researcher -ACC Athlete of the Year. Additionally, Butler, Evan Justice and Tyler McDonough have won seven All-Americas combined.

Over the past three seasons, a combined 18 players have been selected for the MLB Draft, headlined by Will Wilson (2019, Los Angeles Angels) and Patrick Bailey (2020, San Francisco Giants). They are the first Wolfpack players to be drafted in the first round in consecutive seasons. The eight players selected in the 2019 and 2021 MLB Drafts were tied for second in a single season and were one shy of the program record of nine in 2008.

In 2019, NC State posted a 42-19 record, which marked the second straight year and 10th time under Avent that a team had more than 40 wins in a single season. The team went undefeated in their first 19 games, getting their best start to the season in program history as they were one of the last two undefeated teams in the nation. Thanks to its hot start, the Pack was ranked No. 1 in a major poll for the first time in program history, as it held the No. 1 spot in the college baseball rankings for three consecutive weeks (March 18 – April 7).

Four players have earned All-ACC and All-America honors, with Will Wilson being named ACC State’s first-ever Defensive Player of the Year and his first consensus All-American since 2012. Patrick Bailey, running back Buster Posey Award finalist, and Brooks Wallace Award finalist Wilson was also among the Golden Spikes nominees.

In 2018, NC State hosted an NCAA region for the sixth time in program history, with each being led by Avent. The Wolfpack finished the year with an overall record of 42–18, highlighted by tying the school record with 19 ACC wins.


The Wolfpack placed seven players on the All-ACC team, with ACC pitcher of the year Brian Brown and ACC rookie of the year Patrick Bailey. NC State won its first nine series in 2018, including its first seven conference series. The Pack won a road sweep at No. 2 Clemson for the first time since 1997.


His 2017 team won 13 of its last 15 regular season games to earn the program’s third consecutive NCAA Tournament bid. The Wolfpack came one game away from qualifying for the NCAA Super Regionals, but fell short against the host and seventh-seeded Kentucky Wildcats. In 2016, the Pack hosted an NCAA region for the fifth time in program history, all of which came under his leadership. NC State advanced to the Regional Finals but fell short against eventual NCAA champion Coastal Carolina.

Advent’s 2015 campaign knocked on the door of a surprise super regional berth, taking the national fourth-seeded TCU to the brink on their home turf. A core of top executives steered the Wolfpack through a 32-20 regular season. In the ACC tournament, Preston Palmeiro’s back and forth pushed NC State to its first title game since 2010. Southpaw Brian Brown earned NCBWA Freshman All-America honors, one of three starting pitchers in the country.

NC State’s 2014 baseball team saw seven players selected in the MLB Freshman Draft, tied for third all-time at NC State. Carlos Rodon and Trea Turner became the Wolfpack’s first three All-Americans and gave State a pair of first-round picks for the first time in program history. Andrew Knizner earned Freshman All-America honors and a spot on the All-ACC Third Team. Brett Austin joined Turner and Rodon on the All-ACC First Team.

In 2013, the Wolfpack returned to Omaha for the first time since 1968 and the second time in program history. Avent was named the 2013 ABCA Atlantic Region Coach of the Year for his efforts.

Advent’s 25 years in Raleigh have created a legacy of individual and collective victories and achievements:

• 926 career wins
• 19 NCAA Regionals
• 5 NCAA Super Regionals
• 37 All Americans
• 7 of 9 first-team All-Americans in the program’s 117-year history
• 40 All-ACC First Team selections
• 90 total All-ACC selections
• 120 players taken in the MLB draft, 47 since 2014
• ACC and National Coach of the Year in 2003
• 2021 ABCA/Rawlings Atlantic Region Coach of the Year
• Selected to USA Baseball Collegiate national team coaching staff in 2004 and 2015, and named team manager in 2021
• Won a team gold medal at the World University Games in Chinese Taipei in 2004

Since 2003, Avent has taken NC State baseball to a whole new level:

• 710 wins — an average of over 38 per season
• 16 participations in the NCAA tournament
• A school record of six consecutive NCAA appearances from 2003-2008 and 10 NCAA appearances in the past 11 seasons
• First ever NCAA Regional held on campus in 2008, second in 2012, third in 2013, fourth in 2016 and fifth in 2018
• Five NCAA regional championships, five super regional appearances and two super regional championships
• 33 All-American selections and 68 All-ACC selections

No previous period in the program’s history has managed to replicate this level of success. The buzz surrounding Wolfpack baseball really started to take off when Doak Field in Dail Park was renovated in the 2003 and 2004 seasons:

• Annual attendance has increased by more than 65% since the ballpark reopened in 2005
• From 30,407 in 2005 and then a school record of more than 48,000 in 2008
• The Wolfpack broke this record by attracting 52,840 in 2012, benefiting from the Raleigh Regional which hosted 13,324 over four days
• Average of 1,554 per game in 2012 broke previous record
• The 2018 season drew a record-breaking schedule of 100,533 fans, and in 2019 the average season attendance reached a record high of 2,682

NC State has had just 16 head coaches in more than 100 years of college baseball, and only three of them have coached the Wolfpack longer than Avent, who overtook legendary Sam Esposito as coach the program’s all-time winner on May 9, 2010.

“When I came here, I said it was the only job I ever wanted, and that’s truer now than ever,” says Avent. “I’ve been an NC State fan all my life, and that will never change, so this job means more to me. NC State baseball is about tradition, and I’m very proud to be a part of that tradition. .

Prior to coming to NC State, Avent spent eight seasons (1989-96) at New Mexico State University, where he compiled a 224-213 record and left as the second most earning coach. of the school’s history. Avent took over a New Mexico state program that school administrators were considering scrapping and guided it to its greatest success.

Avent began his coaching career as an assistant coach at North Carolina Wesleyan from 1981 to 1982 under former Old Dominion head coach Tony Guzzo, helping lead the Bishops to a two-year record of 62-28 and a fourth-place finish in 1982. NCAA Division III World Series. Avent followed Guzzo to the Virginia Commonwealth in 1983 and worked there for one season. From 1984 to 1985, Avent was an assistant coach at Louisburg (NC) Junior College under Hall of Fame coach Russ Frazier, an NC State alumnus.

After his two seasons at Louisburg, Avent joined Joe Breedon’s staff at William & Mary in 1986 and stayed there for two years. In 1988, he returned to Raleigh to join Ray Tanner’s first staff at NC State and helped guide the Wolfpack to a then-winning record and a 45-16 overall record. He went to New Mexico State the following year.




 

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