Baseball players – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 04:01:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://timothompson.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-60-120x120.png Baseball players – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ 32 32 DraftKings Marketplace adds NFTs of ‘top young’ baseball players https://timothompson.com/draftkings-marketplace-adds-nfts-of-top-young-baseball-players/ Wed, 04 May 2022 11:04:02 +0000 https://timothompson.com/draftkings-marketplace-adds-nfts-of-top-young-baseball-players/ DraftKings has further expanded its NFT offering in partnership with Metabilia. Their collaboration will allow it to provide tokens for the sports betting brand’s NFT service, DraftKings Marketplace. Starting today, Metabilia will publish several NFTs on DraftKings Marketplace as part of a new “Membership” collection. This baseball-focused collection “will chronicle the careers of top young […]]]>

DraftKings has further expanded its NFT offering in partnership with Metabilia. Their collaboration will allow it to provide tokens for the sports betting brand’s NFT service, DraftKings Marketplace.

Starting today, Metabilia will publish several NFTs on DraftKings Marketplace as part of a new “Membership” collection.

This baseball-focused collection “will chronicle the careers of top young players,” including Vladimir Guerrero Jr, Ronald Acuña Jr, Shane Bieber, Wander Franco, Joe Musgrove and Fernando Tatís Jr.

“At Metabilia, we are focused on providing NFT collectible programs that provide high-quality, long-term benefits, and our NFT membership programs allow fans to show their support for a young athlete and be part of their journey,” remarked Joseph A. De Perio, CEO of Metabilia.

“As part of the strategic relationship, DraftKings Marketplace will be the exclusive distributor of authentic Metabilia NFTs that also incorporate historical pieces of in-game used collectibles, career achievements and more.”

DraftKings Marketplace went live last August as part of a deal with Tom Brady’s Autograph platform. Since then, the sportsbook brand has added NFTs from other sports stars, including baseball legend Derek Jeter.

Beth Beiriger, Senior Vice President of Product Operations for DraftKings Marketplace, said, “Affinity for sports collectibles continues to grow in the digital space, and DraftKings Marketplace is committed to creating a priority destination for fans who capture this growth and unlock new experiences.

“Metabilia brings a wealth of capabilities in sports memorabilia and this collaboration represents our latest efforts to immerse fans and form passionate communities around emerging star players.”

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A new model could have a “Moneyball-like” impact on the value of baseball players https://timothompson.com/a-new-model-could-have-a-moneyball-like-impact-on-the-value-of-baseball-players/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/a-new-model-could-have-a-moneyball-like-impact-on-the-value-of-baseball-players/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — In the movie “Moneyball,” a young economics graduate and cash-strapped Major League Baseball general manager present a new way to assess the value of baseball players. Their innovative idea of ​​calculating statistical data and player salaries allowed the Oakland A’s to recruit quality talent overlooked by other teams, completely revitalizing the […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — In the movie “Moneyball,” a young economics graduate and cash-strapped Major League Baseball general manager present a new way to assess the value of baseball players. Their innovative idea of ​​calculating statistical data and player salaries allowed the Oakland A’s to recruit quality talent overlooked by other teams, completely revitalizing the team without going over budget.

New research at Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology could have a similar impact on the sport. The team developed a machine learning model that could better measure the short- and long-term performance of baseball players and teams, compared to existing statistical analysis methods for sports. Building on recent advances in natural language processing and computer vision, their approach would completely change and potentially improve the way a game’s state and a player’s impact on the game are measured.

According to Connor Heaton, a PhD student at the College of IST, the existing family of methods, known as sabermetrics, relies on the number of times a player or team achieves a discrete event – such as hitting a double or a home run. However, it does not take into account the surrounding context of each action.

“Think of a scenario where a player recorded a single in his last plate appearance,” Heaton said. “He could have hit a dribbler on the third base line, got a runner forward from first to second and beat the pitch to first, or hit a ball into deep left field and reached first base comfortably but hadn’t not the speed needed to push for a double Describing the two situations as resulting in a “single” is accurate but doesn’t tell the whole story.

Heaton’s model instead learns the meaning of in-game events based on the impact they have on the game and the context in which they occur, and then produces numerical representations of players’ impact on the game. game by viewing the game as a sequence of events.

“We often talk about baseball in terms of ‘this player hit two singles and a double yesterday’ or ‘he made one for four,'” Heaton said. summary statistic. Our work tries to take a more holistic picture of the game and get a more nuanced computational description of the impact players have on the game.”

In Heaton’s new method, he exploits sequential modeling techniques used in natural language processing to help computers learn the role or meaning of different words. He applied this approach to teach his model the role or meaning of different events in a baseball game – for example, when a batter hits a single. Next, he modeled the game as a sequence of events to provide new insight into existing statistics.

“The impact of this work is the framework that’s offered for what I like to call ‘interrogating the game,'” Heaton said. “We see it as one sequence in all this computer scaffolding to model a game.”

The output of the model can effectively describe a player’s influence on the game in the short term, or its form. Displayed as 64-element vectors – achieved by adapting work from computer vision – these shape embeddings capture a player’s influence in-game and can be used effectively to depict their short-term impact, such as the duration of 15 plate appearances, or averaged together to analyze longer periods, such as over the course of the player’s career. Additionally, when combined with traditional sabermetry, form embeddings can predict the winner of a game with over 59% accuracy.

Heaton described how the embeddings created by both his method and the traditional sabermetric method plot the same data. When viewed over time, sabermetric depictions of player impact can be somewhat sporadic, changing significantly from game to game. Heaton’s method helps “smooth out” the way players are portrayed over time, while allowing player performance to fluctuate.

“Both integrations can help differentiate good players from bad players,” Heaton said. “But ours provides a lot more nuance on exactly how good players impact the game.”

To train their model, the researchers used data previously collected from systems installed in major league stadiums that track detailed information about every pitch thrown, such as player positioning on the field, base occupancy , velocity and rotation of the terrain. They focused on two types of data: step-by-step data, to analyze information such as step type and launch angle; and season-by-season data, to investigate position-specific information such as walks and hits per inning pitched for pitchers and on-base plus slugging percentage for hitters.

Each pitch in the collected dataset has three identifying characteristics: the game in which it took place, the in-game batting number, and the in-batting pitch number. Using these three bits of information, researchers were able to completely piece together the sequence of events that make up an MLB game.

The researchers then identified 325 possible game changes that could occur when a pitch is thrown, such as changes in the number of ball hits and base occupancy. They combined this information with existing stepping data that describes pitching and batting action, then grabbed player records from sabermetrics to be able to describe what happened, how it happened past and who was involved in each game.

The work blends Heaton’s research focus on natural language processing with his interest in the historical statistical analysis of baseball.

“There’s this whole ecosystem built around modeling language and word sequence,” Heaton said. “It seems there was potential for it to be adopted for modeling sequences of other things; to generalize a bit. I started thinking about sports analysis and it seemed like there was a lot to be done to improve both our understanding of the game and the way the game is modeled computationally.

The researchers hope their work will serve as a solid starting point toward a new way of describing the impact of baseball and other sports athletes on the course of the game.

“This work has the potential to significantly advance the state of the art in sabermetrics,” said Prasenjit Mitra, professor of information science and technology and co-author of the paper. “To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first to capture and represent a nuanced state of the game and use this information as context to evaluate individual events that are counted by traditional statistics – for example, by automatically building a model which includes key moments and milestones.

Heaton and Mitra presented their paper, “Using Machine Learning to Describe Player Impact on Play in MLB,” was one of seven finalists in the 2022 Research Paper Competition at the MIT Sloan Sports Conference Analytics earlier this month.

More information about the competition, as well as links to the paper, its open source code and data, can be found at www.sloansportsconference.com/research-paper-competition.

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2022 Fantasy Baseball Players with Multi-Position Eligibility https://timothompson.com/2022-fantasy-baseball-players-with-multi-position-eligibility/ Wed, 30 Mar 2022 15:09:45 +0000 https://timothompson.com/2022-fantasy-baseball-players-with-multi-position-eligibility/ With the 2022 MLB season just a week away, the fantasy baseball draft is kicking into high gear. Over the past three months, we’ve provided you with an array of Fantasy Baseball 2022 player ratings, player projections, articles that highlight things like your Fantasy 2022 baseball crosses and busts, and of course , different fantasy […]]]>

With the 2022 MLB season just a week away, the fantasy baseball draft is kicking into high gear. Over the past three months, we’ve provided you with an array of Fantasy Baseball 2022 player ratings, player projections, articles that highlight things like your Fantasy 2022 baseball crosses and busts, and of course , different fantasy baseball draft strategies to use. We’ve even mapped your drafts with the Ultimate Fantasy Baseball Cheat Sheet.

But there is one draft strategy stone that seems to have gone unturned and that is a straight list of players who have eligibility for multiple positions in fantasy baseball. Drafting players like this not only helps you easily maneuver into your draft, but they will help you throughout the season, especially if your team is bitten by the injury bug. Having the roster flexibility to move guys around throughout the year is huge, so we thought an all-in-one source would help you with your remaining drafts.

Fantasy Baseball Players with Multiple Position Eligibility

(20 games played minimum the previous season)

name Pos Elig
Jonathan Schoop 1B, 2B
Max Muncy 1B, 2B
DJ LeMahieu 1B, 2B, 3B
Wilmer Flores 1B, 2B, 3B
France 1B, 2B, DH
Jace Peterson 1B, 2B, DE
Jake Cronenworth 1B, 2B, SS
Yandy Diaz 1B, 3B
Joshua Fuentes 1B, 3B
Yu Chang 1B, 3B
Travis Shaw 1B, 3B
Willians Astudillo 1B, 3B
Philippe Gosselin 1B, 3B, DE
Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 1B,DH
Trey Mancini 1B,DH
Miguel Cabrera 1B,DH
Pavin Smith 1B, DE
Brad Miller 1B, DE
Jurickson Profar 1B, DE
Matt Beaty 1B, DE
Darin Ruf 1B, DE
Jake Bauer 1B, DE
LaMonte Wade Jr. 1B, DE
Yoshi Tsutsugo 1B, DE
Philip Evans 1B, DE
Alex Kiriloff 1B, DE
Ryan Mountcastle 1B, OF, DH
Ryan O’Hearn 1B, OF, DH
Ryan McMahon 2B, 3B
Eduardo Escobar 2B, 3B
Josh VanMeter 2B, 3B
Hanser Alberto 2B, 3B
Coarse odor 2B, 3B
David Bote 2B, 3B
Matt Dufy 2B, 3B
Joe Panic 2B, 3B
Abraham Torro 2B, 3B
Isan Diaz 2B, 3B
Jon Berti 2B, 3B
Michel Brosseau 2B, 3B
Josh Harrison 2B, 3B, DE
Luis Arraez 2B, 3B, DE
Luis Urias 2B, 3B, SS
Ha Seong Kim 2B, 3B, SS
Jed Lowrie 2B,DH
Whit Merrifield 2B, DE
Tommy Edman 2B, DE
Garrett Hampson 2B, DE
Enrique Hernandez 2B, DE
Tony Kemp 2B, DE
Theiry Garcia 2B, DE
Dylan Moore 2B, DE
Jeff McNeil 2B, DE
Ketel Marte 2B, DE
Zach McKinstry 2B, DE
Marcus Semien 2B, SS
David Flecher 2B, SS
Jorge Polanco 2B, SS
Trea Turner 2B, SS
Javier Baez 2B, SS
Willi Castro 2B, SS
Jazz Chisholm 2B, SS
Edmundo Sosa 2B, SS
Harold Castro 2B, SS
Gavin Lux 2B, SS
Brendan Rodgers 2B,SS
Sergio Alcantara 2B,SS
Ramon Urias 2B, SS
Danny Mendick 2B, SS
Andres Gimenez 2B, SS
Nick Maton 2B, SS
Chris Taylor 2B,SS,DE
Josh Rojas 2B,SS,DE
Mauricio Dubon 2B,SS,DE
Josh Donaldson 3B,DH
Kris Bryant 3B, DE
Hunter Dozier 3B, DE
Eugenio Suarez 3B, SS
Jonathan Villar 3B, SS
Joey Wendle 3B, SS
Gio Urshela 3B, SS
Ronald Torreyes 3B, SS
Tyler Wade 3B,SS,DE
Tyler Stephenson C, 1B
Salvador Perez C.DH
Louis Torrens C.DH
Eric Hase C, DE
Daulton Varsho C, DE
Jorge Alfaro C, DE
Mitch Haniger DE,DH
Jorge Soler DE,DH
Judge Aaron DE,DH
JD Martinez DE,DH
Yordan Alvarez DE,DH
Austin Meadows DE,DH
Giancarlo Stanton DE,DH
Michael Brantley DE,DH
Anthony Santander DE,DH
George Springer DE,DH
Willie Calhoun DE,DH
Fernando Tatis Jr. MES, DE

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Fantasy Baseball 2022 players to target in point leagues https://timothompson.com/fantasy-baseball-2022-players-to-target-in-point-leagues/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 00:32:01 +0000 https://timothompson.com/fantasy-baseball-2022-players-to-target-in-point-leagues/ All other Premium tools are accessible on the Premium Dashboard. Fantasy baseball drafts (and their articles) are nearly all about finding the next superstar and sniffing out late talent, but point formats are usually lumped into rotisserie angles and/or ignored altogether. We can’t have our sad pointy RotoBallers, so let’s write with a different focus […]]]>

All other Premium tools are accessible on the Premium Dashboard.

Fantasy baseball drafts (and their articles) are nearly all about finding the next superstar and sniffing out late talent, but point formats are usually lumped into rotisserie angles and/or ignored altogether. We can’t have our sad pointy RotoBallers, so let’s write with a different focus today to find some strong values ​​I’m targeting in the point leagues.

In order to rate overrated players here, we are going to use the Average Draft Position (ADP) data made available by Fantrax point leagues, as they have separated this data for us from the general ADP which is accurate to the half-March. We know the peak of the fantasy baseball draft season is approaching and we want to be a mainstay for you in the war room.

I reserve the right to change names/analysis as I see fit if situations change, but I’ll be sure to leave a note in bold if I do!

League Goals in Points – Batters

Receiver: Mitch Garver (Fantrax Pts ADP: 263, No. 11 C)

*Note that these are largely single-receiver leagues, just in case you were anchored by the NFBC ADP two-receiver data this offseason.

I don’t like him hitting Texas, but I’ll take any job competition! Did you know Garver’s 2.78 fantasy points per game on Fantrax was seventh best behind the flat? And one of them was Eric Haase, whose path to playing time is questionable. Let’s roll with a cheap Garver who had a horrible 2020 to erase the good memories of 2019. You know, that season where he smashed 31 home runs in just 93 games.

This potency rate is on par with Salvy! I’m not here waiting for the world, but it’s getting awfully late for someone who should casually top 20 homers with an average over .250 and a double-digit walk rate (12.8% last year) . As long as strikeouts don’t break the 30% mark, we should easily take advantage here.

First Base: Josh Bell (FT Pts ADP: 147, No. 13 1B)

Do you remember Josh Bell starting his 2021 on a new team by spending 10 days on the COVID-19 roster? And then how did he only hit .133 with three homers between April 12 and May 12 on his return? Adjusting to a new team can be difficult and we cannot quantify how COVID-19 may or may not have affected their form. What interests me is how it took off and stayed strong once it settled.

Beginning May 13, Bell produced a .287/.375/.513 slash line with 24 home runs and 137 R+RBIs in 121 games. He’s become Washington’s regular three-hole or cleanup hitter and is expected to return to that role behind Juan Soto and Nelson Cruz. Given Bell’s propensity for a walk rate over 10% and a strike rate under 20%, it’s a solid 1B target from this mid-range pack if you go elsewhere with strategies early. The work will be here:

Second Base: Ketel Marte (FT Pts ADP: 84, No. 8 2B)

Ketel is a great scorer because while recent lower-body injuries have limited him to just three interceptions between 2020 and 2021, his pop and batting average remain steady. You can’t expect 32 bouncyball home runs and a .329 average in 2019, but flirting with .300 and hitting 20-25 home runs in the top third of Arizona’s drive is profit point.

He was the No. 7 2B per game on Fantrax last year and allayed fears of a BB% drop shown in the abridged 2020 season. If you need a safer player to lock down the keystone, then Marte is slightly undervalued for its narrower range of results.

Third Base: Justin Turner (FT Pts ADP: 176, No. 14 3B)

Look, another overlooked veteran! I thought having him on a stacked, highlighted Dodgers team would boost him, but no. Turner played in 151 games last year, turning 612 AP into his eighth straight year with an OPS north of 0.830. We’re not counting on him for speed so he can age more gracefully, averaging above 0.270 and an OBP eclipsing 0.350 almost a lock.

Mix LAD’s wild count stats and plate appearance volume from their order discount and you’ve got a points league formula for success. Last season he was the No. 7 3B and No. 9 on a per game basis, so I can’t justify the slippage we’re seeing. All I can say is enjoy and enjoy!

Shortstop: Willy Adames (FT Pts ADP: 135, #18 SS)

For one, there are some hilarious late values ​​to the position like Brandon Crawford being the 25th SS eligible player out of the roster despite being the #7 SS in 2021. Shout regression all you want, but Crawford has a daily role in a powerful SF offense.

But we’re aiming a little higher and highlighting Willy Adames, who should have a full season to flourish away from the Too in 2022. Consider this yet another reminder that Adames had a .197/.254/ .371 for the Rays until his trade in mid-May.

From then on, he would put down .285/.366/.521 while finishing the year as a regular Milwaukee two-hole hitter. Even with the crummy start, Adames was the #11 SS on Fantrax last season and deserves top-12 consideration. Luckily, you don’t have to pay that price to find out!

Outfield: Bryan Reynolds (FT Pts ADP: 88, No. 22 OF)

This is another case of someone being overlooked because they are unlikely to progress beyond what we have seen. But he was also the No. 9 OF last year and is an incredibly complete hitter in the box. As a rookie, Reynolds delivered a .314/.377/.503 slash, but just 16 HR and three interceptions quieted most of the fantastic buzz. Then the shortened 2020 campaign suffered from a laughable BABIP of .231 when it only hit .189! He showed us that was nonsense by producing a .302/.390/.522 line in 21, playing in 159 games to be Mr. Reliable.

That walk rate continues to increase as his strikeouts tend to drop, with most of his output coming from hits, walks, and batting average rather than speed. Combine that with the fact that he’s proving to be an everyday player and he’s well worth your target even if he’s stuck on a below par Pittsburgh team.

League Point Targets – Pitchers

#1 Starting Pitcher: Jose Berrios (No. 21 P, Fantrax Pts ADP: 61)

Berríos is almost too stable for his own good. It’s unlikely to undergo demanding headline stretches, so it won’t stand out on draft lists. But especially in the points leagues, Berríos is a fantastic SP2 or even SP1 if you hit hard. Not only does he pitch for an incredible Toronto team that will win many games, but he’s topped 190 innings in each of the past three full seasons. Shit, 2020.

Regardless, Berríos also stepped up to 21 posting career-best marks in strikeout rate (26.1%) and walk rate (5.8%), producing a K-BB rate of 20.4% which was well above his previous best of 17.7% in 2018. His change is worth highlighting, as he tormented left-handed hitters with and allowed a low batting average of .152 and a 0.266 strike percentage against with.

Unfortunately for us, he’ll rise a bit in the drafts as Chris Sale and Jack Flaherty drift due to injuries, but he was the No. 15 pitcher on Fantrax last season and deserves more respect than the 20-year-olds. People are trying to chase the next top five when they should just pick up a discounted SP1/2 type. Berríos may not have the arsenal to be a top-five SP, but he provides a more stable range of results to build from. Personally, I also appreciate that he honed the mechanics in the offseason and looks in better shape this spring:

Starting pitcher #2: Yu Darvish (No. 30 P, FT Pts ADP: 89)

When I ask you how Darvish did in 2021, you’ll probably remember the poor record of 8-11 or the questionable ERA of 4.22 first. That’s okay, because we’re wired to feel the losses more than the gains in life. It’s not you… it’s, uh, your biology?

OK, Darvish’s freshman year in San Diego wasn’t ideal, but he still had a measly 1.09 WHIP and a healthy 29.2% strikeout rate (199K in 166 ⅓ IP). The high ERA/low WHIP combo came with batters switching approaches, as Darvish was slapped with a 45.3% fly-ball rate on 21. For context, that was just 30, 8% in 2020 and had never exceeded 41% in a previous year. More flyouts are cool, but they also gave a 1.52 HR/9. It likely had roots in the back and hip injuries that cropped up and ultimately ended his season. But guess what?

Darvish was still the #31 pitcher on Fantrax last year! He reportedly cleaned up his mechanics this offseason and his hip healed “well” by Kevin Acee of the San Diego Union-Tribune. I recognize that Darvish is 35 and those injuries may linger, but last season was very different at the start. The first three months gave us a 2.44 ERA despite the 47.6% fly-ball rate (thanks, 11% pop-up rate!). But then we got a 6.65 ERA from July as Darvish fought, although he had a 3.80 xFIP in that window.

Even in those 14 games, he at least kept his signature in control to limit damage on most home runs. The first 10 of those 14 games saw only one walk per game. Costs. But then the injuries probably piled too high as he walked 11 batters in his last four games, including a seven-inning gem against the Cardinals. Ace Darvish is still here, and you should be drooling over the draft discount. Health, a K/BB clutch arm, and better W/L variance await.

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GHC baseball players have time to grow – Six Mile Post https://timothompson.com/ghc-baseball-players-have-time-to-grow-six-mile-post/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 09:02:35 +0000 https://timothompson.com/ghc-baseball-players-have-time-to-grow-six-mile-post/ Georgia Highlands freshmen Trevor Lovett, Ryan Wells, Gray Stephens and Gray Wilson will start their GHC baseball team careers in red shirts. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the term redshirt means “a varsity athlete who is kept out of varsity competition for a year in order to extend his eligibility.” Redshirting is a key process […]]]>

Georgia Highlands freshmen Trevor Lovett, Ryan Wells, Gray Stephens and Gray Wilson will start their GHC baseball team careers in red shirts.

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the term redshirt means “a varsity athlete who is kept out of varsity competition for a year in order to extend his eligibility.”

Redshirting is a key process in the development of college athletes as well as a key role in a coach’s strategy.

Coaches use redshirting on incoming freshmen for a variety of reasons, whether the player is not physically ready or there are better, more experienced players ahead of them.

Wilson said he has learned a lot since he was redshirt.

“It’s been great and it’s been humbling to have a year to improve and get stronger,” Wilson said.

Conversely, Stephens said it had been a chore with lots of ups and downs.

Every player generally felt that being redshirted was the right decision to advance their baseball career and they would not change their decision.

“Coach O was honest that it would be a year-long loss if I only had 10 at-bats when there are a lot of good players ahead of me,” Lovett said of his conversation with baseball head coach Dash O. ‘Neil.

Stephens said his conversation with O’Neill was “realistic” and he also thinks O’Neill “made a great decision”. Other players also said O’Neill was straightforward and honest.

Every player would much rather play in the field, but if the coaching staff reassures redshirt players that it’s the right move for their baseball career, it could make the process much easier for players.

Wilson said coaches reassured him that wearing him in a red shirt was the right decision.

“They (the redshirt players) can still fully train with the team and being around a group of older guys and good players will help me in the long run,” Wilson said.

This type of communication is something Wells expects from the coaching staff.

“Me and [Coach] Hughes talks a lot about what I need to do,” Wells said. “As I get bigger and stronger, we keep talking about what I need to do and what kind of programs I need to do.”

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Personal Data of Major League Baseball Players Stolen https://timothompson.com/personal-data-of-major-league-baseball-players-stolen/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/personal-data-of-major-league-baseball-players-stolen/ Personal data belonging to Major League Baseball players and their family members has been stolen in a cyberattack against a third-party vendor. Consulting firm Horizon Actuarial Services LLC. (Horizon Actuarial), based in Silver Spring, Maryland, was attacked with ransomware in November 2021. In a recent data incident notice, the company revealed that data from its […]]]>

Personal data belonging to Major League Baseball players and their family members has been stolen in a cyberattack against a third-party vendor.

Consulting firm Horizon Actuarial Services LLC. (Horizon Actuarial), based in Silver Spring, Maryland, was attacked with ransomware in November 2021.

In a recent data incident notice, the company revealed that data from its Local 295 IBT employer group welfare fund and Major League Baseball player benefits plan had been compromised. compromised and plundered by cybercriminals.

The breach was reported by the company as affecting 38,418 people. In a separate report, the Major League Baseball Player Benefits Plan said 13,156 people were affected.

Horizon Actuarial’s first warning that an attack had taken place came when the company was contacted by cybercriminals who claimed to have broken into its computer systems.

“On November 12, 2021, Horizon Actuarial received an email from a group claiming to have stolen copies of personal data from its computer servers,” the notice reads.

To verify the legitimacy of the claims emailed by the gang, Horizon Actuarial launched an investigation with the help of third-party IT specialists. The company also took steps to secure its computer servers and notified law enforcement of the possible attack.

The investigation revealed that two Horizon Actuarial computer servers were accessed without authorization for a limited period on November 10 and 11, 2021.

A list of stolen data was provided by the cybercriminals to Horizon Actuarial, which included names, dates of birth, social security numbers, and health plan information.

Faced with the threat of misuse of stolen data, Horizon Actuarial opened its vaults to the cybercriminal gang.

“During the investigation, Horizon Actuarial negotiated with the group and paid them in return for an agreement that it would delete and not distribute or misuse the stolen information,” the report says. notice.

The company did not disclose how much money it paid to the ransomware gang.

Those whose data was implicated in the attack were notified by mail and offered free fraud and identity theft assistance services as well as credit monitoring by Horizon Actuarial.

“We are reviewing our existing security policies and have implemented additional measures to further protect against similar incidents in the future,” the company said.

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Proposed California Bill Would Give Minor League Baseball Players More Control Over Their Name, Likeness and Image | Jackson Lewis CP https://timothompson.com/proposed-california-bill-would-give-minor-league-baseball-players-more-control-over-their-name-likeness-and-image-jackson-lewis-cp/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/proposed-california-bill-would-give-minor-league-baseball-players-more-control-over-their-name-likeness-and-image-jackson-lewis-cp/ Following a recent trial court ruling finding that minor league baseball players are year-round employees, California State Senator Josh Becker introduced legislation proposing that California enacts the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill of Rights. Commenting on his bill, Senator Becker said, “I introduced Senate Bill (SB) 1248 to create the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill […]]]>

Following a recent trial court ruling finding that minor league baseball players are year-round employees, California State Senator Josh Becker introduced legislation proposing that California enacts the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill of Rights.

Commenting on his bill, Senator Becker said, “I introduced Senate Bill (SB) 1248 to create the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill of Rights and pave the way for better wages, a better treatment and fair contracts for these athletes. It’s only fitting that the legislative movement for minor league rights begins in California.

SB 1248 would define a minor league baseball player as a person employed to play baseball for a minor league team affiliated with a major league baseball team and who plays, resides, or is employed in California. This would significantly reduce the current seven (7) year period that a minor league player can remain under the contractual control of a Major League Baseball team. It would expressly prohibit an employment contract concluded on or after January 1, 2023 from having a duration of more than 4 years.

Using legislation similar to the California bill signed into law by Governor Newsom in 2021, which granted college athletes the right to market and profit from their name, image and likeness as a model, this bill would require minor league player employment contracts to allow a player to use his name, image or likeness as he sees fit, the legal right to receive compensation for such use, and any provision prohibiting such use would be void and unenforceable. SB 1248 would also protect a player’s exercise of the right to use his or her name, image, or likeness by prohibiting retaliation in any form against a player as a result of exercising that right.

Becker further commented, “Baseball is called America’s pastime and the minor leaguers just ask what every working American wants. These players demand fair treatment and the opportunity to earn a decent living in decent conditions.

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CA Bill Offers Minor League Baseball Players Name, Image and Likeness Control https://timothompson.com/ca-bill-offers-minor-league-baseball-players-name-image-and-likeness-control/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/ca-bill-offers-minor-league-baseball-players-name-image-and-likeness-control/ Related practices and jurisdictions Following a recent trial court ruling finding that minor league baseball players are year-round employees, California State Senator Josh Becker introduced legislation proposing that California enacts the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill of Rights. Commenting on his bill, Senator Becker said, “I introduced Senate Bill (SB) 1248 to create the Minor […]]]>

Following a recent trial court ruling finding that minor league baseball players are year-round employees, California State Senator Josh Becker introduced legislation proposing that California enacts the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill of Rights.

Commenting on his bill, Senator Becker said, “I introduced Senate Bill (SB) 1248 to create the Minor League Baseball Players’ Bill of Rights and pave the way for better wages, a better treatment and fair contracts for these athletes. It’s only fitting that the legislative movement for minor leaguers’ rights begins in California.

SB 1248 would define a minor league baseball player as a person employed to play baseball for a minor league team affiliated with a major league baseball team and who plays, resides, or is employed in California. This would significantly reduce the current seven (7) year period that a minor league player can remain under the contractual control of a Major League Baseball team. It would expressly prohibit an employment contract concluded on or after January 1, 2023 from having a duration of more than 4 years.

Using legislation similar to the California bill signed into law by Governor Newsom in 2021, which granted college athletes the right to market and profit from their name, image and likeness as a model, this bill would require minor league player employment contracts to allow a player to use his name, image or likeness as he sees fit, the legal right to receive compensation for such use, and any provision prohibiting such use would be void and unenforceable. SB 1248 would also protect a player’s exercise of the right to use his or her name, image, or likeness by prohibiting retaliation in any form against a player as a result of exercising that right.

Becker further commented, “Baseball is called America’s pastime and the minor leaguers just ask what every working American wants. These players demand fair treatment and the opportunity to earn a decent living in decent conditions.

© 2022 Jackson LewisNational Law Review, Volume XII, Number 80

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Brooklyn Park baseball players head to Cooperstown https://timothompson.com/brooklyn-park-baseball-players-head-to-cooperstown/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/brooklyn-park-baseball-players-head-to-cooperstown/ 4:50 p.m. | Thursday, March 17, 2022 The Brooklyn Park Baseball Association is sending two teams to a tournament in Cooperstown, New York this summer. “We are a good team and we have all trained together, and we know each other very well,” said CT player Georgopopulos. The team is planning a pancake breakfast at […]]]>

4:50 p.m. | Thursday, March 17, 2022

The Brooklyn Park Baseball Association is sending two teams to a tournament in Cooperstown, New York this summer.

“We are a good team and we have all trained together, and we know each other very well,” said CT player Georgopopulos.

The team is planning a pancake breakfast at the Brooklyn Park Community Activity Center on March 26 to raise money for the trip. They also have a GoFundMe page.

“A lot of work goes into it both on the training ground, in games and in fundraising,” said coach Mark Schornstein.

Both teams will join a field of over 100 other teams in the tournament.

“It’s going to take a lot of effort to do extremely well, probably even to get past the first round,” said Michael Misko, who also plays for the team.

Coaches say the trip is a tradition for youngsters in the Brooklyn Park Baseball program.

“They’ve been looking forward to it since they started in our league around the age of six,” coach Mike Aasen said. “They will learn baseball history and spend time together.”

The team is optimistic about the trip, and also about the games.

“Everyone is having fun and I can have some hits and everyone is happy,” said Owen Schornstein.

Brooklyn Park

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Judge rules MLB violated wage law, says minor league baseball players are year-round employees https://timothompson.com/judge-rules-mlb-violated-wage-law-says-minor-league-baseball-players-are-year-round-employees/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/judge-rules-mlb-violated-wage-law-says-minor-league-baseball-players-are-year-round-employees/ NEW YORK – A federal judge has ruled that minor leaguers are year-round employees who work during practice and found Major League Baseball violated the state’s minimum wage law. Arizona and was liable for treble damages. U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Spero in San Francisco also ruled that MLB failed to comply with California’s wage […]]]>

NEW YORK – A federal judge has ruled that minor leaguers are year-round employees who work during practice and found Major League Baseball violated the state’s minimum wage law. Arizona and was liable for treble damages.

U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Spero in San Francisco also ruled that MLB failed to comply with California’s wage statement requirements, awarding $1,882,650 in penalties.

Spero unsealed a 181-page decision Tuesday night in a lawsuit filed eight years ago. He ruled that minor leaguers should be paid for travel time to California League road games and for practice in Arizona and Florida.

“These are not students who enrolled in a vocational school on the understanding that they would render services, without remuneration, in the practical training necessary to complete the training and obtain a license,” Spero wrote.

Denying numerous MLB motions for summary judgments, Spero allowed those claims to proceed to trial scheduled for June 1.

He ruled for the players under Arizona state law, leaving only the amount of damages to be determined.

“For decades, minor league players have worked long hours year-round in exchange for pittance,” the Advocates for Minor Leaguers steering committee said in a statement. “Working as a professional baseball player requires much more than just playing baseball games. It also requires hours of training, practice and preparation throughout the year, for which we have never been properly remunerated.

“We are thrilled with today’s ruling, which is a huge step toward holding MLB accountable for its longstanding mistreatment of minor league players.”

MLB had no immediate comment.

The lawsuit was filed by first baseman/outfielder Aaron Senne, a 2009 Florida Marlins 10th-round pick who retired in 2013, and two other retired players who had been lower-round picks : Kansas City infielder Michael Liberto and San Francisco pitcher. Olivier Odle.

They alleged violations of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and state minimum wage and overtime requirements for a work week they estimated at 50 to 60 hours.

Congress enacted the Save America’s Pastime Act in March 2018, which amended the FLSA to exempt baseball players from the law’s minimum wage and overtime requirements.

Spero presided over the case for years.

“The court previously ruled that the plaintiffs were employees rather than interns,” he wrote.

The case was returned to district court by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2019 after lawyers for the players and MLB spent years debating whether it should be given class action status.

Spero ruled that MLB is a joint employer with teams of minor league players; that these players are doing “work” during spring training; that travel time on team buses to away games is compensable under FLSA, Florida and Arizona laws and that travel time for California League players to away games is compensable under California law.

Spero also said federal law does not allow a defense under Florida state law claims. He dismissed claims after the new law in March 2018 and also dismissed claims against former baseball commissioner Bud Selig, who was listed as a defendant in the original lawsuit with the Big League’s 30 clubs.

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