Baseball players – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 09:48:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://timothompson.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-60-120x120.png Baseball players – Timo Thompson http://timothompson.com/ 32 32 MLBPA joins AFL-CIO in bid to organize minor league baseball players https://timothompson.com/mlbpa-joins-afl-cio-in-bid-to-organize-minor-league-baseball-players/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 09:48:39 +0000 https://timothompson.com/mlbpa-joins-afl-cio-in-bid-to-organize-minor-league-baseball-players/ September 21, 2022 McMahon Berger To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com. The Major League Baseball Players Association (MLBPA) announced on September 7, 2022 that it is officially affiliating with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in an […]]]>

To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com.

The Major League Baseball Players Association (MLBPA) announced on September 7, 2022 that it is officially affiliating with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in an effort to strengthen its position. The announcement was made during an appearance by AFL-CIO President Liz Shuler and MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark at the National Press Club.

The MLBPA, which reached its first major league collective bargaining agreement in 1968, launched an organizing campaign for minor league players on August 28.e2022. The MLBPA’s efforts to represent the minor leaguers recently cleared their first hurdle when more than fifty percent (50%) of minor league baseball players signed clearance cards in favor of unionization, vastly surpassing thirty percent (30%) of the required signatures. to call an official election.

On September 6, 2022, the MLBPA applied for voluntary recognition from Major League Baseball (MLB). The Players’ Association sent a “Card Verification Agreement”, in which the league would agree to voluntary recognition, subject to independent verification of authorization cards. On September 9, 2022, MLB announced that it would voluntarily recognize the minor league union.

Organizing more than 5,000 minor leaguers is a major step in a decades-long labor dispute that has escalated in Congress. The MLBPA currently represents players on the 40-man rosters of all 30 MLB teams. The MLBPA is the 58th union to affiliate with the AFL-CIO, the largest labor federation in the United States with 12.5 million members. The AFL-CIO Sports Council already includes player associations from the NFL, National Women’s Soccer League, United Soccer League and US Women’s National Team.

Aligning players with the AFL-CIO could attract other unions representing workers in the sports industry, such as television crews and stadium vendors. In light of these developments, employers in the sports industry should retain the services of experienced labor lawyers to help them formulate their labor relations strategy, including education on the potential effects of signing union authorization cards during organizing efforts.

The St. Louis labor attorneys at McMahon Berger have represented employers nationwide on labor and employment matters for more than sixty years and are available to discuss these and other issues. As always, the above is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice regarding any particular situation, as each situation should be evaluated on its own facts. Choosing a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisements.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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The Major League Baseball Players’ Union will join the ranks of the AFL-CIO (1) https://timothompson.com/the-major-league-baseball-players-union-will-join-the-ranks-of-the-afl-cio-1/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 15:26:06 +0000 https://timothompson.com/the-major-league-baseball-players-union-will-join-the-ranks-of-the-afl-cio-1/ The Major League Baseball Players Association has joined the AFL-CIO, the nation’s largest federation of unions. The move, announced Wednesday by MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark at a National Press Club event in Washington, D.C., comes after the union announced a campaign to organize minor league players at the end of the last month. “The […]]]>

The Major League Baseball Players Association has joined the AFL-CIO, the nation’s largest federation of unions.

The move, announced Wednesday by MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark at a National Press Club event in Washington, D.C., comes after the union announced a campaign to organize minor league players at the end of the last month.

“The MLBPA and each of its 1,200 players have a place in our movement because this union understands and lives the meaning of the word solidarity by harnessing the power of sport and helping others,” said the AFL President. -IOC. Liz Shuler said in a statement.

VIDEO: Union Busting: What Employers Can and Cannot Do Legally

Clark added that the decision to join the federation was partly due to the pandemic, and that it will strengthen the organization and help the MLBPA navigate its final minor league endeavors.

But the top union is unlikely to meddle in the federation’s political work.

In response to a question about whether the MLBPA will play a role in providing campaign contributions or blocking union-endorsed candidates as part of its AFL-CIO membership, Clark said “unlikely “.

“Our organization speaks on behalf of the players. And our players have a number of different interests from a number of different backgrounds,” Clark said. “Politics can be politics, but union support is something our guys can get.”

The MLBPA will become the 58th union to join the AFL-CIO, which represents more than 12 million workers.

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“I believe Major League Baseball players are learning the wrong thing” https://timothompson.com/i-believe-major-league-baseball-players-are-learning-the-wrong-thing/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 20:14:48 +0000 https://timothompson.com/i-believe-major-league-baseball-players-are-learning-the-wrong-thing/ New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez showed his fans how to homer and dispelled baseball’s myth about pitching angles. The former baseball player guarantees that “you will never be out of a job” if you use his direct method. Please take notes. A-Rod explained the difference between a launch angle and a line-to-line approach. “Forget […]]]>

New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez showed his fans how to homer and dispelled baseball’s myth about pitching angles. The former baseball player guarantees that “you will never be out of a job” if you use his direct method. Please take notes.

A-Rod explained the difference between a launch angle and a line-to-line approach.

“Forget the angle of launch and remember the consistency of hitting and batting zone control from line to line. So I believe Major League Baseball players are learning the wrong thing with launch angles.

This is what A-Rod posted for his social media followers.

“How to hit home runs? Forget launch angle. Yeah, right. Link in bio.” – Alex Rodriguez

Baseball’s few greats who swing at the pitch angle are also covered in A-Rod’s video. MLB icons like Pete Rose, Derek Jeter and Ted Williams have had remarkable success with this strategy.

“So if you’re a young man or girl playing baseball or softball, hit the ball hard line to line – you’ll never be out of a job,” Rodriguez added.

Watch the full video here:

youtube cover

Alex Rodriguez finished his career with 696 home runs

Alex Rodriguez press conference
Alex Rodriguez press conference

By the time A-Rod retired in 2016, he had been selected to 14 All-Star Games, won three American League MVP awards and ten Silver Slugger Awards. He also won the World Series in 2009 while playing for the New York Yankees. He played 22 seasons in the MLB.

Rodriguez is one of only 30 players in MLB history to hit 3,000, and is fourth all-time in homers with 696.

Boston Red Sox vs. New York Yankees
Boston Red Sox vs. New York Yankees

He recently joked on social media about his return to MLB.

“You’re telling me…should I make a comeback?”#RaceTo700– Alex Rodriguez

Rodriguez was one of the most productive players in league history. After his retirement, he remained productive. A-Rod has kept himself busy working as a broadcaster for FS1, making appearances on “Shark Tank” and contributing to ESPN’s “Sunday Night Baseball.”

Rodriguez is the CEO of AROD Corp., and he is co-owner of the NBA’s Minnesota Timberwolves.

A-Rod is currently dating fitness model Kathryne Padgett. He is often seen with her publicly – sometimes at a baseball game and sometimes on vacation.


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Former Baseball Players Show Their Appreciation For Their Former Coach https://timothompson.com/former-baseball-players-show-their-appreciation-for-their-former-coach/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 03:18:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/former-baseball-players-show-their-appreciation-for-their-former-coach/ BILOXI, Miss. (WLOX) – In the city of Biloxi, Spud Wieniewitz was the man who coached baseball for years, led the baseball team to 8 championships while changing the sports world in the city. But for his players, he was a teacher. “Spud taught us about life the way he did baseball,” Carl Rackley said. […]]]>

BILOXI, Miss. (WLOX) – In the city of Biloxi, Spud Wieniewitz was the man who coached baseball for years, led the baseball team to 8 championships while changing the sports world in the city.

But for his players, he was a teacher.

“Spud taught us about life the way he did baseball,” Carl Rackley said.

“Teach us to do things the right way no matter what. Whether it’s in school, in baseball or in life,” said John Welter. “He taught us to do it the right way. He insisted that we do it the right way.

“The effort that went into making sure that us ex-players could play a game that we loved to play as teenagers was incredible,” said Brian Kozlowski.

For Spud, he was trying to pass on what he had learned when he was growing up.

“I guess I just needed to be that person to help those guys, give them a little bit of guidance as they grow up where I grew up,” Spud Wieniewitz said.

Spud says he was able to teach his players and take them to many championships with a little help from his wife.

“She was a great guide in everything I did and allowed me to coach and be part of the community as she and I were both retired teachers,” Wieniewitz said. ” I am very honored. I’m very honored and appreciate them saying that impacted me and them, so I’m just thankful and thankful.

“He deserves it. We love him. He’s been a hugely influential man in a lot of our lives,” Kozlowski said.

“Thank you Spud. Thank you for everything. We love you,” Welter said.

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How Baseball Stealers Fared in Summer Leagues https://timothompson.com/how-baseball-stealers-fared-in-summer-leagues/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 13:14:05 +0000 https://timothompson.com/how-baseball-stealers-fared-in-summer-leagues/ Summer is coming to an end and Tennessee baseball players are returning to campus for the start of the fall semester after being spread across the country playing in different baseball leagues this summer. Eighteen different Flights have played in summer leagues over the past few months, including key players Christian Moore and Blake Burke. […]]]>

Summer is coming to an end and Tennessee baseball players are returning to campus for the start of the fall semester after being spread across the country playing in different baseball leagues this summer.

Eighteen different Flights have played in summer leagues over the past few months, including key players Christian Moore and Blake Burke.

Let’s take a look at how Tennessee players performed across the country this summer.

Cape Cod League

LHP Wyatt Evans – Chatham Anglers
6 APP, 4 GS, 1-3, 5.89 ERA, 18.1 IP, 12 R, 12 ER, 19 H, 10 BB, 20 K, 1.58 WHIP

Earned Cape Cod Pitcher of the Week honors on July 26.

Second Baseman / Left Fielder Christian Moore – Hyannis Harbor Hawks

22 GP, .176 AVG, 6 R, 13 H, 2 2B, 1 3B, 8 RBI, 10 BB, 1 SB, .267 OBP, .230 SLG

Appalachian League

BY Kyle Booker – Kingsport Axemen
29 GP, .310 AVG, 27 R, 31 H, 7 2B, 1 3B, 1 HR, 24 RBI, 19 BB, 8 SB, .425 OBP, .430 SLG

Helped lead the Axmen to an Appalachian League championship.

INF/OF Ethan Payne – Johnson City Doughboys

30 GP, .207 AVG, 21 R, 19 H, 4 2B, 1 HR, 11 RBI, 23 BB, 2 SB, .398 OBP, .283 SLG

California Collegiate League (League of Wooden Bats)

1B Blake Burke – Heraldsburg Prune Packers

34 GP, .308 AVG, 27 R, 33 H, 6 2B, 6 HR, 37 RBI, 14 BB, 1 SB, .407 OBP, .523 SLG

Helped lead the Prune Packers to a California Collegiate League championship.

DE Hunter Ensley – Foresters of Santa Barbara

25 GP, .395 AVG, 16 R, 34 H, 4 2B, 1 3B, 2 HR, 19 RBI, 8 BB, 11 SB, .535 SLG, .465 OBP

RHP Hollis Fanning – Walnut Creek Crayfish

10 APP, 7 GS, 2-4, 0 SV, 3.42 ERA, 52.2 IP, 24 R, 17 ER, 44 H, 4 BB, 33 K, 1.18 WHIP

Tears of Kavares OF/1B – Walnut Creek Crawdads

33 GP, .244 AVG, 18 R, 29 H, 5 2B, 4 HR, 24 RBI, 14 BB, 5 SB, .387 SLG, .326 OBP

Coastal Plains League

INF Angus Pence – Forest City Owls

31 GP, .245 AVG, 15 R, 26 H, 5 2B, 15 RBI, 7 BB, 3 SB, .303 OBP, .287 SLG

New England Collegiate League

Utility Logan Chambers – Sharks of Martha’s Vineyard

32 GP, .378 AVG, 33 R, 45 H, 4 2B, 1 3B, 5 HR, 27 RBI, 24 BB, 3 SB, .497 OBP, .534 SLG

Helped lead the Vineyard Sharks to the league championship with a home run in the eighth inning of the championship game.

C Charlie Taylor – North Shore Navigators

21 GP, .197 AVG, 5 R, 12 H, 1 HR, 7 RBI, 7 BB, 2 SB .300 OBP, .246 SLG

Ohio Valley League

C Ryan Miller – Full Rhythm

30 GP, .252 AVG, 29 R, 28 H, 5 2B, 6 HR, 21 RBI, 25 BB, .459 SLG, .418 OBP

Prospect League

RHP/C Andrew Kribbs – Johnstown Mill Rats

Batsman: 44 GP, .165 AVG, 16 R, 16 H, 3 2B, 1 3B, 2 HR, 14 RBI, 15 BB, .277 OBP, .278 SLG
Launch: 11 APP, 4 GS, 2-2, 0 SV, 9.22 ERA, 27.1 IP, 34 R, 28 ER, 36 H, 25 BB, 26 K

LHP Drew Patterson – Alton River Dragons

2 APP, 0 GS, 1-1, 0 SV, 10.38 ERA, 4.1 IP, 5 R, 5 ER, 8 H, 1 BB, 3 K

Rockies Baseball League

LHP Jake Fitzgibbons, infielder Austen Jaslove and LHP Kaleb Meredith played for the Hays Larks. Statistics were not available.

Sunbelt Baseball League

LHP Zander Sechrist – Gainesville Gol’Diggers

5 APP, 5 GS, 2-0, 0 SV, 1.02 ERA, 26.1 IP, 3 R, 3 ER, 17 H, 1 BB, 28 K, 0.68 WHIP

The Gol’Diggers won the league title thanks to a strong start from Sechrist in the championship match.

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10 Jewish Baseball Players From History You Might Not Know https://timothompson.com/10-jewish-baseball-players-from-history-you-might-not-know/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 17:02:37 +0000 https://timothompson.com/10-jewish-baseball-players-from-history-you-might-not-know/ (JTA) Jewish baseball fans (and many non-Jews) know the names and accomplishments of Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg, as well as their hallowed status in the great books of American Jewish history. But they were far from the only Jewish baseball players to impact the game during the 20th century. Howard Megdal, who writes for […]]]>

(JTA) Jewish baseball fans (and many non-Jews) know the names and accomplishments of Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg, as well as their hallowed status in the great books of American Jewish history.

But they were far from the only Jewish baseball players to impact the game during the 20th century.

Howard Megdal, who writes for Baseball Prospectus and extensively on women’s sports, released an updated version of his 2009 book “The Baseball Talmud: The Definitive Position-by-Position Ranking of Baseball’s Chosen Players” in May. To mark the moment, we’ve highlighted 10 lesser-heralded players from his long list — all of whom played long before contemporary Jewish baseball stars like Alex Bregman and Max Fried were born.

They’re listed here in alphabetical order (by last name), along with the years they played, the teams they played for, and their notable stats.

Morrie Arnovitch, DE (1936-1941, 1946)

Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants

.287 batting average, 261 RBIs in

Born in 1910 in Superior, Wisconsin, Arnovich’s parents pushed him to become a rabbi. Needless to say he had other ideas. Arnovich, reportedly dubbed “Son of Israel” in the Jewish press, played five full seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants before enlisting in the military in 1942. after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was a National League All-Star in 1939 with the Phillies, hitting .324 with 67 RBIs. During his career, Arnovich hit for a high batting average and played excellent defense, compiling an impressive .981 save percentage. After his playing days, he returned to Superior, where he coached at a local Catholic high school. He died of a coronary artery blockage at age 48 and was buried in Superior Hebrew Cemetery.

Mike Epstein, 1B (1966-1974)

Baltimore Orioles, Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, Oakland Athletics and California Angels

.244, 130 homers

Nicknamed “Superjew” by an opposing minor league manager, Epstein was the leading Jewish slugger of his era. He was a college All-American at the University of California, Berkeley and won a gold medal with the U.S. Olympic team before the Baltimore Orioles signed him for $20,000 in 1964. Even s he played in spacious parks his entire career and never hit for a high average, he flashed on home run power, hitting 19 or more homers in four seasons.

Sid Gordon, DE (1941-1943, 1946-1955)

New York Giants, Boston/Milwaukee Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates

.283, 202 HR

When Gordon returned from Coast Guard duty in 1946, he began a nine-season streak in which he was one of baseball’s top players for the New York Giants, Boston Braves (and Milwaukee ) and the Pittsburgh Pirates. Every year from 1948 to 1951 he hit 26 or more homers, hit 90 or more runs, and hit .284 or more. His best season came in 1948, when he hit .299 with 30 home runs and 107 RBIs. When the Brooklyn Dodgers, looking for a Jewish player, signed Sandy Koufax, team owner Walter O’Malley said he hoped Koufax could be as good as Hank Greenberg or Sid Gordon . During a game against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1949, he was hit with anti-Semitic slurs from the opposing bench, prompting Cardinals manager Eddie Dyer to berate his team, saying “Sid is one of my friends”.

Elliott Maddox, DE (1970-1980)

Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles and New York Mets

.261, 234 RBI

Before tearing his knee in 1975, Maddox was considered the best defensive center in the American League. He could also hit for average, hitting .304 from the start of 1974 until he was injured in 1975, and displayed excellent discipline at the plate, consistently walking more than he hit. Maddox, born an African-American Baptist, took courses in Judaic studies at the University of Michigan and converted to Judaism before the 1974 season. He said, “I received inner peace with conversion. I really feel at home.

Erskine Mayer, HPR (1912-1919)

Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago White Sox

91-70 record, 2.96 ERA

Mayer ended his career with the infamous 1919 Chicago Black Sox – as one of the players who didn’t get caught pitching World Series games. In 1913, at age 23, Mayer began a six-season streak with an ERA (running average earned) of 3.15 or less. In 1915, he recorded a 2.36 ERA as the No. 2 starter behind the great Grover Cleveland Alexander, as the Philadelphia Phillies won the pennant. In Game 2 of the World Series, he pitched a full game, giving up only one earned run. His career ERA of 2.96 is the third-lowest on record for a Jewish pitcher, behind only Barney Pelty (see more on him below) and Koufax.

Dave Roberts, HPL (1969-1981)

San Diego Padres, Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Seattle Mariners and New York Mets

103-125, 3.78 ERA

Roberts was a very good starter and reliever when he stayed healthy. From 1970 to 1974, he won 61 games with a 3.22 ERA for some mediocre-to-bad San Diego Padres and Houston Astros teams. In 1979, the Pittsburgh Pirates acquired Roberts for the stretch run and he pitched great in 38.2 innings, helping Pittsburgh win the World Series. In 1971, he went just 14-17 for the Padres as they lost 100 games, but he finished with a 2.10 ERA and finished sixth in the NL Cy Young Award voting top pitcher. of the league.

Hello Rosen, DE (1937-1939, 1944-1946)

Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants

.291, 197 RBI

Although he played in the minor leagues for most of his prime, Rosen made a major league impact for the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants, combining high batting averages with excellent defense. Rosen started pro ball in 1932, but remained in Double A for five seasons, despite hitting between .293 and .314 and excellent defense in center field. He went to the show in 1937 and played well part-time for three seasons before being sold to Columbus in the American Conference, and he remained in the minors for four years. In 1944 Rosen got another shot and in 1945 he took off, hitting .325 and earning an All-Star appearance. Born in Toronto to Russian immigrants, he is said to have expressed pride in being the first Jewish-Canadian baseball player in the major leagues, a distinction he would retain for decades.

Barney Pelty, HPR (1903-1912)

St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators

2.63 ERA, 693 strikeouts

Called “The Yiddish Curver” – a nickname he liked to have – for his wicked curveball, Pelty had a successful 10-year career with the St. Louis Browns, as well as 11 games with the Washington Senators. He recorded an ERA below 2.85 in his first seven seasons, finishing below 2.00 twice, an incredibly rare feat in modern times. In 1906, he went 16-11 with a 1.59 ERA, second lowest in the American League. Pelty’s parents were among the first Jews to live in Farmington, Missouri, where Barney grew up.

Larry Sherry, HPR (1958-1968)

Los Angeles Dodgers, Detroit Tigers, Houston Astros and California Angels

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53-44, 3.67 MPM

Sherry came to the big leagues as a starter, but the Dodgers quickly turned him into a reliever. He posted eight solid seasons from 1959 to 1966 with the Dodgers and Detroit Tigers, finishing with an ERA below 3.00 each year. In the 1959 World Series, Sherry won two games while pitching in relief, including the deciding Game 6, as the Dodgers defeated the Chicago White Sox. As Dodger’s teammates between 1959 and 1962, Sherry and his brother Norm formed one of the few Jewish receiving-pitcher batteries in baseball history, and the first (and to date only) battery of brothers. jews.

Steve Stone, HPR (1971-1981)

San Francisco Giants, Chicago White Sox, Chicago Cubs and Baltimore Orioles

107-93, 3.97 ERA, 1980 Cy Young Award

When Stone made his debut in 1971, Larry Jansen, a Giants coach, called him “the most promising young pitcher we’ve seen since Juan Marichal arrived.” In 1980, Stone hosted one of the most surprising seasons in baseball history. After finishing with an ERA below 3.95 only once in the previous seven seasons, Stone went 25-7 with a 3.23 ERA for the Baltimore Orioles, earning the American League Cy Young Award. Writer Ron Fimrite, in the May 17, 1971, issue of Sports Illustrated, called Stone “a Jewish intellectual…who may well be a right-hander (Sandy) Koufax.” Stone would go on to become a longtime television commentator for the Chicago Cubs and later the Chicago White Sox.

To read more content, visit www.jta.org.

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10 Historical Jewish Baseball Players You May Not Know — But You Should https://timothompson.com/10-historical-jewish-baseball-players-you-may-not-know-but-you-should/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 01:38:20 +0000 https://timothompson.com/10-historical-jewish-baseball-players-you-may-not-know-but-you-should/ JTA — Jewish baseball fans (and many non-Jews) know the names and accomplishments of Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg. Both of these players have hallowed status in the greatest books of American Jewish history. But they were far from the only Jewish baseball players to impact the game during the 20th century. Howard Megdal, who […]]]>

JTA — Jewish baseball fans (and many non-Jews) know the names and accomplishments of Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg.

Both of these players have hallowed status in the greatest books of American Jewish history.

But they were far from the only Jewish baseball players to impact the game during the 20th century.

Howard Megdal, who writes for Baseball Prospectus and extensively on women’s sports, released an updated version of his 2009 book “The Baseball Talmud: The Definitive Position-by-Position Ranking of Baseball’s Chosen Players” in May.

To mark the moment, we’ve highlighted 10 lesser-heralded players from his long list — all of whom played long before contemporary Jewish baseball stars like Alex Bregman and Max Fried were born.

They’re listed here in alphabetical order (by last name), along with the years they played, the teams they played for, and their notable stats.

A photo of the Morrie Arnovich 1940 Play Ball card. (Wikimedia Commons/via JTA)

Morrie Arnovitch, outfield (1936-1941, 1946)

Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants
.287 batting average, 261 RBIs in

Born in 1910 in Superior, Wisconsin, Arnovich was pushed by his parents to become a rabbi. Needless to say he had other ideas. Arnovich, reportedly dubbed “Son of Israel” in the Jewish press, played five full seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants before enlisting in the military in 1942. after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was a National League All-Star in 1939 with the Phillies, hitting .324 with 67 RBIs. During his career, Arnovich hit for a high batting average and played excellent defense, compiling an impressive .981 save percentage. After his playing days, he returned to Superior, where he coached at a local Catholic high school. He died of a coronary artery blockage at age 48 and was buried in Superior Hebrew Cemetery.

Washington Senators infielder Mike Epstein smiles for the camera, June 5, 1967. (Getty Images/ via JTA)

Mike Epstein, first base (1966-1974)

Baltimore Orioles, Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, Oakland Athletics and California Angels
.244, 130 home runs

Nicknamed “Superjew” by an opposing minor league manager, Epstein was the leading Jewish slugger of his era. He was a college All-American at the University of California, Berkeley and won a gold medal with the U.S. Olympic team before the Baltimore Orioles signed him for $20,000 in 1964. Even s he played in spacious parks his entire career and never hit for a high average, he flashed on home run power, hitting 19 or more homers in four seasons.

Sid Gordon, center, pictured with legends Jackie Robinson and Joe DiMaggio in 1949. (Getty Images/ via JTA)

Sid Gordon, Outfield (1941-1943, 1946-1955)

New York Giants, Boston/Milwaukee Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates
.283, 202 HR

When Gordon returned from Coast Guard duty in 1946, he began a nine-season streak in which he was one of baseball’s top players for the New York Giants, Boston Braves (and Milwaukee ) and the Pittsburgh Pirates. Every year from 1948 to 1951 he hit 26 or more homers, hit 90 or more runs, and hit .284 or more. His best season came in 1948, when he hit .299 with 30 home runs and 107 RBIs. When the Brooklyn Dodgers, looking for a Jewish player, signed Sandy Koufax, team owner Walter O’Malley said he hoped Koufax could be as good as Hank Greenberg or Sid Gordon . During a game against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1949, he was hit with anti-Semitic slurs from the opposing bench, prompting Cardinals manager Eddie Dyer to berate his team, saying “Sid is one of my friends”.

Elliott Maddox of the Washington Senators poses for a portrait in 1971. (Louis Requena/MLB via Getty Images/ via JTA)

Elliott Maddox, Outfield (1970–1980)

Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles and New York Mets
.261, 234 RBI

Before tearing his knee in 1975, Maddox was considered the best defensive center in the American League. He could also hit for average, hitting .304 from the start of 1974 until he was injured in 1975, and displayed excellent discipline at the plate, consistently walking more than he hit. Maddox, born an African-American Baptist, took courses in Judaic studies at the University of Michigan and converted to Judaism before the 1974 season. He said, “I received inner peace with conversion. I really feel at home.

Philadelphia Phillies players Otto Knabe, left, and Erskine Mayer, right, are pictured on the field, 1913. (Wikimedia Commons/ via JTA)

Erskine Mayer, Right-handed pitcher (1912–1919)

Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago White Sox
91-70 record, 2.96 ERA

Mayer ended his career with the infamous 1919 Chicago Black Sox – as one of the players who didn’t get caught pitching World Series games. In 1913, at age 23, Mayer began a six-season streak with an ERA (running average earned) of 3.15 or less. In 1915, he recorded a 2.36 ERA as the No. 2 starter behind the great Grover Cleveland Alexander, as the Philadelphia Phillies won the pennant. In Game 2 of the World Series, he pitched a full game, giving up only one earned run. His career ERA of 2.96 is the third-lowest on record for a Jewish pitcher, behind only Barney Pelty (see more on him below) and Koufax.

Dave Roberts. (Wikimedia Commons/via JTA)

Dave Roberts, Left-handed pitcher (1969–1981)

San Diego Padres, Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Seattle Mariners and New York Mets
103-125, 3.78 ERA

Roberts was a very good starter and reliever when he stayed healthy. From 1970 to 1974, he won 61 games with a 3.22 ERA for some mediocre-to-bad San Diego Padres and Houston Astros teams. In 1979, the Pittsburgh Pirates acquired Roberts for the stretch run and he pitched great in 38.2 innings, helping Pittsburgh win the World Series. In 1971, he went just 14-17 for the Padres as they lost 100 games, but he finished with a 2.10 ERA and finished sixth in the NL Cy Young Award voting top pitcher. of the league.

Brooklyn Dodgers baseball player George ‘Goody’ Rosen is shown ready to swing the bat. (Getty Images/via JTA)

Hello Rosen, Outfield (1937-1939, 1944-1946)

Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants
.291, 197 RBI

Although he played in the minor leagues for most of his prime, Rosen made a major league impact for the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants, combining high batting averages with excellent defense. Rosen started pro ball in 1932, but remained in Double A for five seasons, despite hitting between .293 and .314 and excellent defense in center field. He went to the show in 1937 and played well part-time for three seasons before being sold to Columbus in the American Conference, and he remained in the minors for four years. In 1944 Rosen got another shot and in 1945 he took off, hitting .325 and earning an All-Star appearance. Born in Toronto to Russian immigrants, he is said to have expressed pride in being the first Jewish-Canadian baseball player in the major leagues, a distinction he would retain for decades.

A scanned copy of a Barney Pelty baseball card for the American Tobacco Company, 1909-11. (Heritage Art/Heritage Images via Getty Images/ via JTA)

Barney Pelty, Right-handed pitcher (1903-1912)

St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators
2.63 ERA, 693 strikeouts

Called “The Yiddish Curver” – a nickname he liked to have – for his wicked curveball, Pelty had a successful 10-year career with the St. Louis Browns, as well as 11 games with the Washington Senators. He recorded an ERA below 2.85 in his first seven seasons, finishing below 2.00 twice, an incredibly rare feat in modern times. In 1906, he went 16-11 with a 1.59 ERA, second lowest in the American League. Pelty’s parents were among the first Jews to live in Farmington, Missouri, where Barney grew up.

Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Larry Sherry sits on the steps before a 1959 World Series game in Los Angeles. (Hy Peskin/Getty Images/ via JTA)

Larry Sherry, Right-handed pitcher (1958–1968)

Los Angeles Dodgers, Detroit Tigers, Houston Astros and California Angels
53-44, 3.67 MPM

Sherry came to the big leagues as a starter, but the Dodgers quickly turned him into a reliever. He posted eight solid seasons from 1959 to 1966 with the Dodgers and Detroit Tigers, finishing with an ERA below 3.00 each year. In the 1959 World Series, Sherry won two games while pitching in relief, including the deciding Game 6, as the Dodgers defeated the Chicago White Sox. As Dodger’s teammates between 1959 and 1962, Sherry and his brother Norm formed one of the few Jewish receiving-pitcher batteries in baseball history, and the first (and to date only) battery of brothers. jews.

Steve Stone of the Baltimore Orioles throws during a Major League Baseball spring training game, circa 1981. (Focus on Sport/Getty Images/ via JTA)

Steve Stone, Right-handed pitcher (1971–1981)

San Francisco Giants, Chicago White Sox, Chicago Cubs and Baltimore Orioles
107-93, 3.97 ERA, 1980 Cy Young Award

When Stone made his debut in 1971, Larry Jansen, a Giants coach, called him “the most promising young pitcher we’ve seen since Juan Marichal arrived.” In 1980, Stone hosted one of the most surprising seasons in baseball history. After finishing with an ERA below 3.95 only once in the previous seven seasons, Stone went 25-7 with a 3.23 ERA for the Baltimore Orioles, earning the American League Cy Young Award. Writer Ron Fimrite, in the May 17, 1971, issue of Sports Illustrated, called Stone “a Jewish intellectual… who just might be a right-hander (Sandy) Koufax.” Stone would go on to become a longtime television commentator for the Chicago Cubs and later the Chicago White Sox.

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Two local baseball players occupied seven months https://timothompson.com/two-local-baseball-players-occupied-seven-months/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 14:50:58 +0000 https://timothompson.com/two-local-baseball-players-occupied-seven-months/ Ian Babey and Josh Gjormand have certainly worked in a wide variety of baseball in the 2022 season, as the hometown players were each members of four different teams over the course of seven months. Each started their season playing for varsity teams – Babey as a freshman right-handed pitcher for Community College of Baltimore […]]]>

Ian Babey and Josh Gjormand have certainly worked in a wide variety of baseball in the 2022 season, as the hometown players were each members of four different teams over the course of seven months.

Each started their season playing for varsity teams – Babey as a freshman right-handed pitcher for Community College of Baltimore County, Essex, and Gjormand as a junior left-handed pitcher/first baseman for Lynchburg University .

Then, during the summer, each played for three other teams.

Until early July, the 6-foot Babey played for the Windy Hill Whales of the Beach Collegiate Baseball League in Myrtle Beach. At the end of that season, he played for the American Legion Vienna Post 180 team, then competed in a few contests for the Maryland State Crabfest at the 77th Annual All-American Amateur Baseball Association Tournament in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. .

Babey pitched six innings for Crabfest. He allowed one earned run, struck out four and suffered a loss.

The South Lakes High School graduate compiled a 3-0 record for the Vienna Post 180, helping the team win the regular season and District 17 tournament titles. For Windy Hill in the four-week league, Babey pitched 22 2/3 innings, including two complete shutouts, and he received the league’s Cy Young pitching award as well as another pitching award.

He was 2-0 with one stoppage in 20 1/3 innings, with 28 strikeouts for Essex, making 13 appearances.

Babey hopes to make the grade at a four-year college in the future.

Gjormand, a Madison High graduate, started the year playing for Division III team Lynchburg. He hit .347 and had 20 RBIs for the team, and made one pitching appearance.

During the summer months, the 5-10 Gjormand played for the Chili Dogs of the Northern Virginia College League, where he was a top pitcher with multiple wins. He was also a member of an MVP International college baseball team that appeared in a few games in Europe.

Gjormand then wrapped up summer play by making two impromptu relief pitching appearances for the Burlington Sock Puppets of the Appalachian Collegiate Baseball League. He pitched four innings, allowed one earned run and struck out four for the Sock Puppets. He worked three innings with three strikeouts in one of those outings.

Gjormand joined Burlington for its final two regular season games as the team was pitching short. He was recommended as an emergency replacement by Lynchburg head coach Lucas Jones and pitching coach Travis Beazley, as they knew Gjormand had pitched well for the Chili Dogs.

Burlington lost in the tournament-league championship game against Kingsport. Madison High graduate Ryan Murphy, Gjormand’s former teammate at school, was chosen as the title game’s most valuable player.

The right-handed pitcher started and allowed just one earned run and two hits, while striking out five in five innings of work to secure the victory for Kingsport.

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10 Jewish Baseball Players From History You May Not Know (But You Should) https://timothompson.com/10-jewish-baseball-players-from-history-you-may-not-know-but-you-should/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/10-jewish-baseball-players-from-history-you-may-not-know-but-you-should/ (JTA) — Jewish baseball fans (and many non-Jews) know the names and accomplishments of Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg, as well as their hallowed status in the great books of American Jewish history. But they were far from the only Jewish baseball players to impact the game during the 20th century. Howard Megdal, who writes […]]]>

(JTA) — Jewish baseball fans (and many non-Jews) know the names and accomplishments of Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg, as well as their hallowed status in the great books of American Jewish history.

But they were far from the only Jewish baseball players to impact the game during the 20th century.

Howard Megdal, who writes for Baseball Prospectus and extensively on women’s sports, released an updated version of his 2009 book “The Baseball Talmud: The Definitive Position-by-Position Ranking of Baseball’s Chosen Players” in May. To mark the moment, we’ve highlighted 10 lesser-heralded players from his long list — all of whom played long before contemporary Jewish baseball stars like Alex Bregman and Max Fried were born.

They’re listed here in alphabetical order (by last name), along with the years they played, the teams they played for, and their notable stats.

A photo of the Morrie Arnovich 1940 Play Ball card. (Wikimedia Commons)

Morrie Arnovitch, DE (1936-1941, 1946)

Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants

.287 batting average, 261 RBIs in

Born in 1910 in Superior, Wisconsin, Arnovich’s parents pushed him to become a rabbi. Needless to say he had other ideas. Arnovich, reportedly dubbed “Son of Israel” in the Jewish press, played five full seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants before enlisting in the military in 1942. after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was a National League All-Star in 1939 with the Phillies, hitting .324 with 67 RBIs. During his career, Arnovich hit for a high batting average and played excellent defense, compiling an impressive .981 save percentage. After his playing days, he returned to Superior, where he coached at a local Catholic high school. He died of a coronary artery blockage at age 48 and was buried in Superior Hebrew Cemetery.

Mike Epstein.

Mike Epstein smiles for the camera, June 5, 1967. (Getty Images)

Mike Epstein, 1B (1966-1974)

Baltimore Orioles, Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, Oakland Athletics and California Angels

.244, 130 homers

Nicknamed “Superjew” by an opposing minor league manager, Epstein was the leading Jewish slugger of his era. He was a college All-American at the University of California, Berkeley and won a gold medal with the U.S. Olympic team before the Baltimore Orioles signed him for $20,000 in 1964. Even s he played in spacious parks his entire career and never hit for a high average, he flashed on home run power, hitting 19 or more homers in four seasons.

Jackie Robinson, Sid Gordon and Joe DiMaggio.

Sid Gordon, center, pictured with legends Jackie Robinson and Joe DiMaggio in 1949. (Getty Images)

Sid Gordon, DE (1941-1943, 1946-1955)

New York Giants, Boston/Milwaukee Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates

.283, 202 HR

When Gordon returned from Coast Guard duty in 1946, he began a nine-season streak in which he was one of baseball’s top players for the New York Giants, Boston Braves (and Milwaukee ) and the Pittsburgh Pirates. Every year from 1948 to 1951 he hit 26 or more homers, hit 90 or more runs, and hit .284 or more. His best season came in 1948, when he hit .299 with 30 home runs and 107 RBIs. When the Brooklyn Dodgers, looking for a Jewish player, signed Sandy Koufax, team owner Walter O’Malley said he hoped Koufax could be as good as Hank Greenberg or Sid Gordon . During a game against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1949, he was hit with anti-Semitic slurs from the opposing bench, prompting Cardinals manager Eddie Dyer to berate his team, saying “Sid is one of my friends”.

Elliott Maddox.

Elliott Maddox of the Washington Senators poses for a portrait in 1971. (Louis Requena/MLB via Getty Images)

Elliott Maddox, DE (1970-1980)

Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators/Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles and New York Mets

.261, 234 RBI

Before tearing his knee in 1975, Maddox was considered the best defensive center in the American League. He could also hit for average, hitting .304 from the start of 1974 until he was injured in 1975, and displayed excellent discipline at the plate, consistently walking more than he hit. Maddox, born an African-American Baptist, took courses in Judaic studies at the University of Michigan and converted to Judaism before the 1974 season. He said, “I received inner peace with conversion. I really feel at home.

Erskine Mayer.

Erskine Mayer, right, shows with Phillies teammate Otto Knabe in 1913. (Wikimedia Commons)

Erskine Mayer, HPR (1912-1919)

Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago White Sox

91-70 record, 2.96 ERA

Mayer ended his career with the infamous 1919 Chicago Black Sox – as one of the players who didn’t get caught pitching World Series games. In 1913, at age 23, Mayer began a six-season streak with an ERA (running average earned) of 3.15 or less. In 1915, he recorded a 2.36 ERA as the No. 2 starter behind the great Grover Cleveland Alexander, as the Philadelphia Phillies won the pennant. In Game 2 of the World Series, he pitched a full game, giving up only one earned run. His career ERA of 2.96 is the third-lowest on record for a Jewish pitcher, behind only Barney Pelty (see more on him below) and Koufax.

Dave Roberts.

Dave Roberts, circa 1977. (Wikimedia Commons)

Dave Roberts, HPL (1969-1981)

San Diego Padres, Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Seattle Mariners and New York Mets

103-125, 3.78 ERA

Roberts was a very good starter and reliever when he stayed healthy. From 1970 to 1974, he won 61 games with a 3.22 ERA for some mediocre-to-bad San Diego Padres and Houston Astros teams. In 1979, the Pittsburgh Pirates acquired Roberts for the stretch run and he pitched great in 38.2 innings, helping Pittsburgh win the World Series. In 1971, he went just 14-17 for the Padres as they lost 100 games, but he finished with a 2.10 ERA and finished sixth in the NL Cy Young Award voting top pitcher. of the league.

Brooklyn Dodgers baseball player George “Goody” Rosen is shown ready to swing the bat. (Getty Images)

Hello Rosen, DE (1937-1939, 1944-1946)

Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants

.291, 197 RBI

Although he played in the minor leagues for most of his prime, Rosen made a major league impact for the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants, combining high batting averages with excellent defense. Rosen started pro ball in 1932, but remained in Double A for five seasons, despite hitting between .293 and .314 and excellent defense in center field. He went to the show in 1937 and played well part-time for three seasons before being sold to Columbus in the American Conference, and he remained in the minors for four years. In 1944 Rosen got another shot and in 1945 he took off, hitting .325 and earning an All-Star appearance. Born in Toronto to Russian immigrants, he is said to have expressed pride in being the first Jewish-Canadian baseball player in the major leagues, a distinction he would retain for decades.

Barney Pelty.

A scanned copy of a Barney Pelty baseball card for the American Tobacco Company, 1909-11. (Heritage Art/Heritage Images via Getty Images)

Barney Pelty, HPR (1903-1912)

St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators

2.63 ERA, 693 strikeouts

Called “The Yiddish Curver” – a nickname he liked to have – for his wicked curveball, Pelty had a successful 10-year career with the St. Louis Browns, as well as 11 games with the Washington Senators. He recorded an ERA below 2.85 in his first seven seasons, finishing below 2.00 twice, an incredibly rare feat in modern times. In 1906, he went 16-11 with a 1.59 ERA, second lowest in the American League. Pelty’s parents were among the first Jews to live in Farmington, Missouri, where Barney grew up.

Larry Sherry.

Larry Sherry of the Los Angeles Dodgers sits on the steps before a 1959 World Series game in Los Angeles. (Hy Peskin/Getty Images)

Larry Sherry, HPR (1958-1968)

Los Angeles Dodgers, Detroit Tigers, Houston Astros and California Angels

53-44, 3.67 MPM

Sherry came to the big leagues as a starter, but the Dodgers quickly turned him into a reliever. He posted eight solid seasons from 1959 to 1966 with the Dodgers and Detroit Tigers, finishing with an ERA below 3.00 each year. In the 1959 World Series, Sherry won two games while pitching in relief, including the deciding Game 6, as the Dodgers defeated the Chicago White Sox. As Dodger’s teammates between 1959 and 1962, Sherry and his brother Norm formed one of the few Jewish receiving-pitcher batteries in baseball history, and the first (and to date only) battery of brothers. jews.

Steve Stone.

Steve Stone of the Baltimore Orioles throws during a Major League Baseball spring training game, circa 1981. (Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

Steve Stone, HPR (1971-1981)

San Francisco Giants, Chicago White Sox, Chicago Cubs and Baltimore Orioles

107-93, 3.97 ERA, 1980 Cy Young Award

When Stone made his debut in 1971, Larry Jansen, a Giants coach, called him “the most promising young pitcher we’ve seen since Juan Marichal arrived.” In 1980, Stone hosted one of the most surprising seasons in baseball history. After finishing with an ERA below 3.95 only once in the previous seven seasons, Stone went 25-7 with a 3.23 ERA for the Baltimore Orioles, earning the American League Cy Young Award. Writer Ron Fimrite, in the May 17, 1971, issue of Sports Illustrated, called Stone “a Jewish intellectual…who may well be a right-hander (Sandy) Koufax.” Stone would go on to become a longtime television commentator for the Chicago Cubs and later the Chicago White Sox.

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Japanese director’s documentaries about young Chinese baseball players attract filmmakers’ attention https://timothompson.com/japanese-directors-documentaries-about-young-chinese-baseball-players-attract-filmmakers-attention/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://timothompson.com/japanese-directors-documentaries-about-young-chinese-baseball-players-attract-filmmakers-attention/ Photo: screenshot from the documentary film Pursue Following rave reviews for the 2020 Touch Out sports documentary, two baseball documentaries were screened at the 2022 FIRST International Film Festival in Xining, northwest China’s Qinghai Province. One of the works is a new film by Japanese director Ryo Takeuchi. Takeuchi’s new documentary film, Pursue, continues to […]]]>

Photo: screenshot from the documentary film Pursue

Following rave reviews for the 2020 Touch Out sports documentary, two baseball documentaries were screened at the 2022 FIRST International Film Festival in Xining, northwest China’s Qinghai Province. One of the works is a new film by Japanese director Ryo Takeuchi.

Takeuchi’s new documentary film, Pursue, continues to focus on the same subject covered in Touch Out, a baseball training base in Beijing called Power Baseball. The base is a non-governmental public benefit project for poor children started by Sun Lingfeng, former captain of the Chinese national baseball team. Basically, more than 20 boys from poor families live and train together.

In the Japanese director’s work, the teenagers who appeared in the 2020 film have grown up, and Sun is still trying to give these boys from poor families access to a bigger world through baseball.

According to the newspaper, when talking about his motivations for shooting a baseball documentary at the film festival, Takeuchi said, “Baseball is a sport I’ve loved since childhood. When I arrived in China, baseball didn’t t was not as popular as it was in Japan and there were few opportunities to play the sport. But in recent years, baseball has become more popular in China, with more people playing the game. led me to the idea of ​​documenting the growth of baseball from a niche to a universal sport, to witness the development of the game in China.”

The director said he wanted to convey the charm of the sport to more Chinese audiences through his documentary.

The 2020 documentary covers the moment these children had the chance to compete against children from other countries after flying to the United States in 2018 under a sponsorship program to play in an U11 tournament . It currently has a rating of 8.7/10 from over 15,000 reviews on Chinese media review platform Douban.

Feng, a film buff living in Beijing, said she was deeply touched by the story. She told the Global Times that while the film depicts the team’s many setbacks, it is also hopeful as these boys are still growing and their future is full of possibilities.

She added that she was happy to watch the boys’ follow-up stories in the new documentary, which is available on Chinese video-sharing platform Bilibili.

Another baseball-themed documentary, The Plateau Stones, screened at the film festival. The artwork targets ethnic Tibetan youth playing baseball on set, giving audiences the opportunity to learn about the sport and Tibetan youth chasing their dreams.

Director Wang Lu shared his experience shooting the film over the past seven years.

“A report in 2015 drew me into the universe of these children living on the set. I did not expect the filming to last seven years, during which we overcame many difficulties such as the difficult environmental conditions , language barriers, the pandemic and funding. . But the charm and tenacity of these children pushed me to surpass myself. Seeing the positive and life-changing things of these children, I think it’s why am I hanging on,” Wang said, according to a report by The Paper. .

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